Tag Archives: knee pain

Meet Steven Page, MD – Sports Medicine Physician

Throughout last year we profiled all our physicians here at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates in a series of interviews. We were pleased to have Steven Page, MD join our SOA group late last year as  Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Physician.  This week, we posed those same questions to him so you might get to know him better.

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Dr Page, what inspired you to become a physician?

When I was in high school, I injured my ankle playing soccer. I went to see an orthopedic sports medicine doctor. He took great care of me and led me through a rehabilitation program that got me back to playing quickly so I didn’t have to miss the season.   I loved playing and being around sports.  I knew then I wanted to be a sports medicine doctor so I could take of people the way he took care of me.

Why orthopedics?

I really like that we can actually fix problems and get people back to doing the things they like to do.

What do you love most about your job?

I love that my patients are really motivated to get back to what they enjoy. When patients are engaged in their own care, we work together like a team to accomplish their goals.

What is your biggest challenge?

Finding a way to spend as much a time as I can with every patient while not making the next patient I see have to wait.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a __________________.

A veterinarian. I have two boxers and I absolutely love animals.

Your proudest moment?

A college football player that I did a knee surgery on during my fellowship is still playing in the NFL over 10 years later today. I am proud that I had a small part in enabling his success.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled? Why?

My favorite place visited is Maui, Hawaii. You can be on top of a volcano that looks like a Martian landscape in the morning and scuba diving with sea turtles in the afternoon.

Any hobbies? Activities?

I love to play sports and enjoy skiing and scuba diving. I get injured a little easier now as I get older so it helps me relate to my patients.

What’s your next adventure?

Becoming a father. I trained for years to be a surgeon, but I am totally unprepared for this.

Your guilty pleasure food?

French fries and macaroni and cheese. And I don’t feel guilty about it all!

Tablet with the text Sports medicine on the display

Whether you are a weekend warrior, professional athlete, or just a regular couch potato who overused those muscles and bones,  Dr Page sees patients of all  walks of life and all ages from pediatric to geriatric. If you’d like an evaluation, call 941-951-2663 or schedule an appointment with us online through our web page at www.SOA.md.   We have three locations and offer same day appointments. To keep up to date on everything at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates “like” us on Facebook HERE, or, follow us on Twitter HERE.

KNEE PAIN? Get Back In The Game

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To the casual observer the sport of golf may seem a relaxing, calm respite from daily routine, however nothing is farther from the truth. Today in the U.S. there are over 25 million golfers and 15-20% of them will experience some form of golf injury. Of those, 80% will be from overuse and improper form. Worse, 50% of golf injuries will become chronic.

Low back pain is cited as the #1 complaint from golfers; however knee pain takes its toll on golfers as a very common ailment. This is hardly a surprise when you realize the sport requires excessive rotation of the knee as well as disproportionate force during your swing. When simply walking you are distributing your body weight evenly. In golf, the principal hazard to the knee is on the downswing when the forward knee experiences 4 ½ times your body weight and the opposite knee 3 ½ times. For example, a right handed golfer of 180 pounds will place 810 pounds of weight onto their left knee from a powerful downswing. This process repeated over 18 holes places a heavy burden on the knees, particularly the left knee.

One of the more common knee injuries we see in golfers is a meniscus tear. The meniscus is a shock absorber, with one located on either side of the knee to help evenly distribute weight across the knee. When a meniscus is torn, you may have pain, swelling, or stiffness, and may find yourself suddenly off balance from your knee “giving out”. Golf activity may exacerbate a pre-existing tear.

So, how can you prevent or limit injury to continue enjoying your game? Here are some tips:

  • If you haven’t golfed for an extended period of time, don’t jump back into the game. Ease in slowly.
  • Perform appropriate warm ups with stretching, including calves, to diminish risk of injury.
  • To stabilize your knees, keep your lower back and hip muscles strengthened with proper and regular exercises; see your physical therapist or golf coach for tips.
  • Increase your overall flexibility.
  • Use a ball retriever instead of bending at the knees to pick up your ball.
  • Decrease the frequency of your games when you have knee discomfort. If you typically golf 3 or 4 times a week, reduce that to once or twice. Rest between games. Repeating the same activity every day will intensify your condition.
  • A knee brace during play may help lessen discomfort.
  • Ice your knees for 10-15 minutes after 18 holes.
  • If you’ve had knee surgery, it is critical to follow your physical therapy protocol and receive clearance from your physician.

Jeffrey Silverstein, MD is a Fellowship Trained and Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon with a specialty in hip and knee joint reconstruction. At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.  Fore!

What’s That Sound? SNAP, CRACKLE, POP

knuckle cracking

It’s a question most orthopedic surgeons get asked on a daily basis: “My joint pops…is that normal?” Like most things in life, if it’s not broke (or hurting), don’t fix it. An acute injury resulting in an audible “pop” is different from a situation such as a hip “popping” for years. Popping, cracking, or crunching of joints is quite common and often nothing to be too concerned with, especially if it is not causing discomfort or affecting one’s activities. Here are some need to know tidbits on joint popping and cracking.

What Causes This?

  • Numerous theories and causes exist including ligament stretching, tendons snapping, nerves subluxing, or bubbles forming within the joint. A recent study investigated the bubble theory using MRI videos to propose the mechanism by which “cracking” your knuckles results in a negative-pressure event which draws synovial fluid into the joint, thus leading to the subsequent pop. Why does it feel good to crack a knuckle? Thoughts are that the pressure phenomenon within/around the joints stimulates certain receptors which allows for muscles to relax. Another theory suggests natural painkillers (endorphins) are released with such activity, which may explain why it can be a difficult habit to break.
  • Other things must also be taken into account when discussing the cause of noise around a joint, such as prior injuries, surgeries, hardware/implants around the joint, and other accompanying symptoms. It is quite common for someone who injures their ACL to feel or hear a “pop” from the ligament rupturing. This must be taken in a different context from the chronic, painless popping that someone may experience around their knee cap from soft-tissue issues.
  • Lastly, arthritis can commonly be accompanied with crunching or cracking sensations and as long as it is not resulting in increasing pain or swelling, it is something that can be observed. Some older style knee/hip implants may result in noises (e.g. squeaking), and if you were experiencing this, it would likely be best to visit with your orthopedic surgeon to check the status of things and make sure the components were not wearing out in an abnormal fashion.

Should I Be Concerned?

In general, if the popping/cracking around a joint is not causing pain or swelling to occur or interfering with your function or activities, there shouldn’t be much concern. Studies have looked at whether or not cracking your knuckles would lead to arthritis, and to date, no such correlation has been shown. That said, it is generally recommended that one not perform such activities too frequently or on purpose as there have been reports of joints/knuckles becoming loose from habitual cracking. In addition, habitual knuckle crackers have been shown to develop hand swelling (not from arthritis) and decreased grip strength which can lead to decreased manual function. Nodules can also form from such activity, and this may cause cosmetic concerns for certain patients.

Common Areas to Experience It

Any joint can develop it, but perhaps the most common areas to experience it are in the hands, knees, spine, and shoulders.

  • As already mentioned, knuckle cracking is a common occurrence.
  • With regards to the knee, the anterior aspect often experiences popping/crunching from the patellofemoral joint (knee cap). This can be from mild softening of the joint, but most of the time it is from soft-tissues in the area (e.g. plica, fat pad) that simply release themselves during motion.
  • Similar to the knuckles in the hand, the facet joints and other muscles/ligaments around the spine are prone to popping.
  • The spine is a complex unit with numerous muscles, joints, discs, and ligaments contributing to its stability. Chiropractors make a living out of therapeutically popping, cracking, and aligning patients’ backs, so why would you get too concerned with your back popping if you’re not having any discomfort with it?
  • Lastly, the AC joint of the shoulder almost always develops arthritis, but rarely causes too much pain or functional limitation. Popping over this portion of the shoulder with no other symptoms is quite common. On the contrary, patients with symptomatic instability or arthritis in the shoulder joint proper will almost always have pain or issues with their function accompanying this, and would thus be treated differently to the above mentioned scenarios.

Summary

Painless popping around joints is an issue that one should hardly ever get too concerned with. If popping occurred from an acute injury or there were other symptoms being experienced in addition to it, then a visit with your orthopedic surgeon would be recommended at that point. Otherwise, keep up what you are doing and don’t let some painless noise around a joint stress you out.

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Trevor Born, MD is an orthopedic surgeon with a specialty in sports medicine. At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life. We have four convenient locations and offer same day appointments when needed. Visit our website at www.SOA.md or call us at 941-951-2663 for an appointment. Appointments may also be made via our website.

 

POKEMON GO? OR NO?

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By now you’ve likely heard of the new craze, Pokémon Go. So what’s all the fuss about and why would you want to participate?  We admit at first blush, we had no interest but then we got to thinking this could be a good thing … even a healthy thing if done correctly. Say what?

Some history first. The original Pokémon appeared a little over 20 years ago for the video game device, Game Boy. The internet was just being developed at that time and not accessible to most. Pokémon was based on a coming-of-age tale hidden in a theme of “collecting” bugs while travelling through caves, cities, and forests to battle monsters on the Game Boy device. The designer of the game, Satoshi Tajiri, was an enthusiastic insect collector with a passion for Japanese monster movies, thus his inspiration.

Fast forward to today, and the theme still resonates with hundreds of shapes and sizes to reflect those odd little critters you see on your smartphones. A player creates their avatar to go in search of, and collect, Pokémon at PokeStops and PokeGyms while tossing PokeBalls and hatching PokeEggs. In fact, in Japan, they love the anime so much that there are posted real cartoon figures at locations across the city and tourists seek them out for pictures. But wait, we digress.

This new Pokémon Go is not a couch potato game as it was in the 90’s. To be successful at the game, you need to get outside.  Wow … fresh air.  Then you have to move. Double wow … exercise! We like that idea. Pokémon Go is a virtual game via avatar combined with having  you in the real world.  You must physically walk around to find the little creatures and you must walk a specified number of steps to level up.  It’s more complicated than that and you’ll need to google it and download an app if you want to join, but this game is being played by people of all ages and not going away anytime soon. Some people are playing in groups and some are using it to meet new friends. Some are teens and some are seniors. Some are competitive and some are just enjoying the fun and exercise.

PokemonGo

So why are we writing about this on an orthopedic blog? Well … people are getting hurt. Here are some safety tips:

  • Pay attention to WHERE you are. There have been cases of people being lured to locations only to be robbed; take your quest with a buddy or in a group. Be safe.
  • Look up! Don’t keep your eyes glued to your smartphone while walking in search of Pokémon. Consider this habit in the same dangerous category as texting while walking. Use the app in vibration mode so you can enjoy your surroundings while you walk, yet get an alert when you’re near a capture.
  • Finally, and here is where we can help … many people participating in Pokémon Go haven’t exercised regularly or even at all; they end up suffering problems with their legs, knees, and feet. Our caution is to begin slowly and don’t overdo it just as with any exercise.

If you do overextend yourself on a Pokémon Go journey, or if you take a nasty spill, give us a call at 941-951-2663. You may also go to our website at www.SOA.md to schedule an appointment through our home page at the green button. We have four convenient locations and offer same day appointments when needed. The commitment at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life. Enjoy the journey and be safe!

SUMMER IS A PERFECT TIME FOR POOL THERAPY

pool therapy

One of the advantages living in Florida is our sunny weather year round so it is not unusual to have daily access to a pool, whether at a private home, community development, or a local Y. Even if you’re in a climate with cold winter temperatures, there are gyms offering year round swimming. From an orthopedic perspective, swimming is one of the most beneficial exercises you can do, and better yet, it can be so much fun that you don’t think of it as exercise.

When prescribed as Aquatic Therapy, there are many techniques and forms of bodywork. Applications include those for spine pain, musculoskeletal discomfort, post-operative rehabilitation, and disabilities or disorders. It may be most beneficial when non-weight bearing exercises are needed or when normal range of motion is limited due to pain, inflammation, or rehabilitation.

Water has properties that provide resistance which are beneficial in exercising. Because of these properties, the muscles actually work harder when submerged in water compared to doing that same exercise on dry ground. Try to imagine running through water and how much more difficult it would be and how much more time it would take to cover the same distance as running a mile on land. Submersion into the water makes it harder to move because of the buoyancy. This resistance also helps tone muscle and improve balance.

Pool exercise can also burn calories. An average 30 minute pool exercise routine can burn off approximately 300 calories. The water also helps reduce body fatigue as it supports so much of the body weight. Pool exercises, done three or four times a week, could result in weight loss and be fun in the process!

Water is also known to have an added benefit on the body and brain. There is a theory called “blue mind” that suggests being close to, in, over, or under the water makes us happier and healthier. For this reason, yoga studios and massage spas incorporate waterfalls into their décor. The gentleness of being near or in the water sends a soothing feeling of relaxation and can lower blood pressure.

PT Pool

Pool therapy has become a widely accepted form of exercise and is now offered in many gym facilities, parks, and community developments. The Arthritis Foundation has even partnered with many YMCA’s across the country in a program called PACE, or People with Arthritis Can Exercise. In fact, they have an excellent website with great tips for a water walking routine. Always check with your physician before beginning any exercise regimen. http://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/exercise/workouts/simple-routines/water-walking.php

At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates we have an on-site therapy pool at our Bahia Vista location as well as a team of expert physical therapists at our offices. To learn more about us, click here or call us at 941-951-2663 for an appointment.

 

Sources: brainline.org; SOA.md website; Wikipedia; Arthritis Foundation

BAD TO THE BONE: Treating Knee Pain

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The knee is a very complex joint with many components making it vulnerable to a variety of injuries. When damaged, it can seriously impact your quality of life. Knee pain is one of the most common reasons people visit an orthopedic physician. Difficulty standing and walking can greatly diminish your sense of independence. The GOOD news is that most collective knee pain problems are treatable.

The CAUSES OF KNEE PAIN are many, including injury and disease. Injuries of the knee commonly seen tend to be damage to the anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, and the meniscus. There are an estimated 2.5 million sports-related injuries a year just by adolescent athletes alone. A fracture is most often caused by trauma such as a car accident, a fall, or sports contact; the most common broken bone in the knee is the patella, more generally known as the kneecap.

Fast facts on knee injuries:

  • The highest knee injury rates occur in people between the ages of 15 to 24.
  • Sports participation is a high risk factor for knee injuries.
  • 60% of high school sports-related injuries occur in the knee.
  • Female basketball and soccer athletes are as much as 8 times more likely to suffer an ACL injury than a male.
  • Young athletes suffering an ACL injury will have an increased risk of arthritis as they age.

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Avoiding knee injuries:

  • Warm up properly prior to exercising or participating in sports.
  • Wear proper footwear with a good fit.
  • Don’t increase sports or exercise workouts suddenly.
  • Wear knee guards in sports activities.
  • Maintain strong, flexible leg muscles.
  • Always, always, always … Use a seatbelt when driving.

The MOST WIDESPREAD DISEASE affecting the knee is arthritis, which is caused by the gradual wearing-away of cartilage. Primary symptoms are pain, swelling, and stiffness in the knee. Currently, there is no “cure” for arthritis, however there are options, both surgical and non-invasive. Depending on the amount of arthritic damage, treating knee pain may often be done without surgery. These options may include one or a combination of physical therapy, weight control, injections, medications, bracing, exercise, and strengthening. When considering knee replacement surgery, the physicians and physical therapists at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates have a wide array of experience and expertise.

Whatever the cause of your knee pain, from sports injury to trauma to arthritis, the 13 physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates are here to help alleviate your discomfort. We have four convenient locations. Browse here to view our physicians and their specialties or call us at 941-951-2663 to make an appointment.

Sources: SOA.md website; MediLexicon International; arthritis.org; webMD

One-on-One with Trevor Born, MD

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The past few weekly blogs have provided insight to our physicians on a personal level with our one-on-one interviews.  This week, we sit down with Trevor Born, MD, who is Fellowship Trained in Sports Medicine. Dr Born is a Bradenton native with impressive local accolades and we’re so pleased he returned to Florida after completing his medical education.

What inspired you to become a physician?

A couple reasons: Seeing the positive role physicians have in their patients’ lives, including my family members. Also knowing that physicians are constantly challenged and driven to continue the learning process not only for themselves but to further advance their patient care abilities.

Why orthopedics?

Why not? I was mainly drawn to orthopedics from my love for sports. I always thought, “Man, how awesome would it be to be the team doc for the Gators?” Coupled with the fact that building, architecture, and math were always passions of mine, the decision to pursue Orthopedics was a pretty easy one for me to make.

What do you love most about your job?

Establishing relationships with patients as I treat them for their chronic conditions or as they proceed on their journey to recovery from a serious injury. That about sums it up.

What is your biggest challenge?

Following Gator sports too much and their recent struggles? Really though, the most difficult struggle in today’s medical landscape is finding more time to care for and get to know my patients.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be an ________

Architect, teacher, or musician.

Your proudest moment?

That would be whenever I receive a letter from a patient or their family members letting me know how thankful they were for the care I provided.  Not many other moments out there make me feel as thankful and proud of my role as a physician.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled?  Why?

Yellowstone National Park. The natural wonders and wildlife, scenery, volatile terrain, and how much of it is still truly unknown makes it pretty interesting in my mind.

Any hobbies?  Activities?

Guitar/music as I have been playing since middle school and there is never a party that could not benefit from a little guitar. When I have the chance I like following Gator sports and continuing to play golf, basketball, and tennis.

What’s your next adventure?

Starting a family.

Your guilty pleasure food?

Dark chocolate.

NOTE: Trevor Born, MD is Fellowship Trained in Sports Medicine with a specialty in upper and lower extremities. You may read his professional medical biography by clicking here.  Dr Born is one of 13 SOA physicians in four locations (Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton). Sarasota Orthopedic Associates offers same day appointments when needed.  Our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

INSPIRATION JUST AHEAD — Meet Dr Kim Furman

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The fifth in our series of getting to know our SOA physicians on a personal level features Dr Kim Furman, Fellowship Trained and Board Re-Certified Orthopedic physician.  Dr Furman specializes in hip and knee joint replacements, and there’s an inspirational side of him you may not know.  Read about it here:

What inspired you to become a physician?

Great question but difficult to answer.  Since age 9 while growing up in Brooklyn, I wanted to go into medicine. Perhaps I was influenced by my next door neighbor, who was general physician, as well as my childhood pediatrician, who made house calls, when I was sick.  Surprisingly, my parents never directed me to the medical field but fully supported my decision.

Why orthopedics?

Several factors influenced my decision for Orthopedics.

As a kid, I was always working with my Dad in his basement workshop, building and repairing all sorts of stuff.  I was mechanically inclined and loved working with my hands.

For 7 years, while in college and medical school, I was an operating room technician at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center. I had the opportunity to work with all the surgical specialties.  I was fascinated by reconstructive plastic surgery and this became my initial focus.  During that time I suffered a traumatic knee injury.  A close friend of my family was an orthopedic surgeon.  He took care of my knee injury and had a significant impact on redirecting my focus to orthopedics.

While continuing work at Columbia Presbyterian, I rotated through orthopedics.  It was at that point that my decision for orthopedics was solidified.  I loved all the neat tools that were used.  Working on fixing fractures was just like woodworking I did as a kid and continue to do now.

Unfortunately, I suffered numerous complications from my knee injury and seven surgical procedures later resulted in significant knee arthritis.  My personal experience with my injury, multiple surgeries, and arthritis has given me an inside view of the problems of my patients.  I can empathize easily with them.

What do you love most about your job?       SOAStudio-170

The gratification I get from returning a patient to a pain free life style.

What is your biggest challenge?

The ever changing medical environment (insurance, government intrusion) that has taken away the true art of medicine and has made it a business.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be an ________________.

Anthropologist/archaeologist

Your proudest moment? 

The birth of my 2 children.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled?  Why?

China, because of the incredible history and culture developments.

Any hobbies?  Activities?

Woodworking, gardening, fishing and traveling.   I was an avid softball, tennis, and paddleball player before my knee arthritis limited those activities.

What’s your next adventure?

A trip to the Antarctic.

Your guilty pleasure food?

Pepperoni pizza

NOTE:  Dr Kim Furman is  a Fellowship Trained and Board Re-Certified Orthopedic Surgeon. He specializes in the treatment of arthritic knees and hips and has been with Sarasota Orthopedic Associates for 30 years. You may read his medical CV by clicking HERE.  SOA treats both adults and children in four locations (Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton) and offers same day appointments when needed. For more about SOA, click HERE, or call 941-951-2663 for an appointment.

TENNIS ANYONE?

tennis racket and ball

Tennis is one of the more popular sports on the Gulf Coast of Florida. Year round competition at all levels can unfortunately lead to various “overuse” injuries, and some athletes may even sustain acute traumatic injuries which may force them to miss time. An overview of common injuries as well as ways of preventing and treating them may help to keep a tennis player on the court.

Tennis Elbow

Perhaps the most dreaded of all the overuse conditions is “Tennis Elbow,” or lateral epicondylitis. A degenerative process affecting the tendons on the lateral aspect of the elbow, which help to bend the wrist backwards, it is commonly seen in tennis players given that these muscles help resist impact when the racquet strikes the ball. Combined with their importance in gripping the handle, these muscles/tendons are prone to overuse if not properly prepared. Strengthening, a regular warm-up routine, and paying attention to grip size can help minimize the risk of developing the condition. Treatment often includes rest, therapy, braces, medications, and injections. While most cases improve with these conservative measures, occasionally surgery is needed.

Shoulder Injuries

The shoulder, like the elbow, is also predisposed to overuse injuries in tennis players. The serve is a complex motion that not only requires a balance of muscle coordination around the shoulder, but good core and lower extremity flexibility and strength to minimize risk of injury. The rotator cuff muscles can often become fatigued or weak, which can throw off the balance, and irritate surrounding tissues. The tendons and surrounding bursa can become inflamed, which may affect one even off the court. Again, conservative treatment is often all that is needed, not only focusing on the shoulder, but providing a total body program to minimize the stress on the shoulder during strokes. If symptoms persist, then further imaging and possible surgery may be needed, especially if a rotator cuff tear is present.

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Lower Extremity Injuries

The legs are just as important as one’s arms on the tennis court. Rapid changes of direction, sudden stopping and acceleration, and jumping are often needed during a match. Muscle strains, knee and ankle sprains, and stress injuries can occur during these movements. Strains, such as “pulling” a hamstring or calf muscle, can often be prevented by adequate stretching prior to playing. An awkward step or twisting episode may result in a sprain. Ankle sprains almost always improve with conservative measures, but recurrent sprains may result in continued instability and require surgery. Knee sprain treatment depends on what is injured. While certain ligament and tendon issues around the knee can heal with non-operative treatment, meniscal and ACL tears often need surgery, but this is determined on a patient-to-patient basis.  Quickly increasing the amount of tennis one is playing may predispose them to a stress fracture, either in the lower leg or foot. These require rest and off-loading of the limb, possibly with the assistance of crutches. Lastly, proper footwear is vital to the health of the lower extremities and minimizing the risks of these conditions.

Summary

Understanding the spectrum of conditions that can affect tennis players is often a good first step into learning ways to avoid them. Every patient/athlete is unique and working with them through their condition in a customized approach will best enable them to get back in the game.

Trevor Born, MD  is a Sports Medicine Physician at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates treating upper and lower extremities with non-surgical treatment as well as minimally invasive options. Click HERE for more information.

 

How much do YOU know?

SKELETON THINKING

Try our fun orthopedic quiz …

  1. What is the meaning of the word orthopedic?
  2. How many bones in the adult human body?
  3. In what part of the body are most of our bones located?
  4. What does PRP stand for, and what is it?
  5. Where is the largest bone in the human body?
  6. What is Radiofrequency Ablation?
  7. Where is the smallest bone in the human body?
  8. What is the most commonly broken bone in the adult human body?
  9. How are falls best prevented?
  10. What is the number one cited reason for seeing an orthopedic physician?

answers

How did you do?   Check your answers here:

  1. Orthopedic comes from the Latin “ortho” (meaning free from deformity) and “pais” (meaning child). Early orthopedists would brace children to grow upward, strong, and straight. At SOA we treat children as well as adults.
  2. The human skeleton at birth is composed of 270 bones. By adulthood, some of these have fused together and decrease to 206, reaching maximum density at around age 30.
  3. Hands have the most bones, 27 in each hand. Feet are a close second with 26 in each foot.
  4. PRP stands for Platelet Rich Plasma. Blood is drawn, then centrifuged to separate the blood from the platelets; it is then injected into the appropriate site. The theory is that a large quantity of platelets might contribute to healing factors.
  5. The femur, or thighbone, is the largest bone in your body.
  6. RFA is a procedure where a specialized needle uses heat at a nerve site to block pain signals to the brain.
  7. The smallest bone is found in the middle ear, called the stapes.
  8. Almost half of adult broken bones are in the arm.
  9. Exercising may reduce injuries and improve balance.
  10. Knee pain was cited as the number reason in the U.S. for visiting an orthopedic physician.

Did you learn something new about orthopedics?  Want more?  Be sure to check all our blogs for information on many of these subjects, or, goto our home page at  www.SOA.md and learn all about us. Our goal is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life!  Call us at 941-951-2663 (BONE)  for an appointment at one of our three locations with one of our thirteen orthopedic physicians.