Tag Archives: Sarasota Orthopedic Associates

Time Out with Johnny Gibbs, MD

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Our weekly blogs have given us fascinating insight to the more personal side of our SOA physicians. This week we sat down with Johnny Gibbs, MD, a Fellowship Trained, Board Certified Sports Medicine Physician, and learned a bit more about what makes him tick.

What inspired you to become a physician?

I originally started my career as a physical therapist, and learning more about disease processes, I developed a strong interest in medicine.  During my first year as a physical therapist, a young patient of mine, Claire, passed away from what seemed to be medical complications of her disease.  She was a young woman, in her thirties, a single mother, and wonderful person.  I will never forget how helpless I felt over her passing and as a result, was compelled to pursue medicine to help improve patient outcomes.

Why orthopedics?

My original interest in sports medicine and rehabilitation was sparked when I was a patient myself during high school.  That, along with a background in physical therapy, made it an obvious decision for me.

What do you love most about your job?

I love that I’m able to give people their active life back and alleviate their pain.   And, of course, I love the detail and intricacy of operating!

Gibbs with girl in cast   Gibbs surgery

What is your biggest challenge?

Trying to meet patient expectations while dealing with the constantly evolving challenges of the healthcare environment is an enormous task. At times our hands may appear to be temporarily tied as a result of changes in healthcare and insurance. I want patients to know I am their advocate.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a __________________.

That’s easy … If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a football coach.

Your proudest moment?

Even easier answer … Becoming a father to my children.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled? Why?

Bamberg, Germany, a small picturesque town famous for its smoked beer. Why? It’s delicious!

Any hobbies? Activities?

I love sports, watching ESPN, exercising, golfing, and spending time outdoors with my children.

What’s your next adventure?

My wife and I are going on a European river cruise to celebrate her graduation from dermatolopathology training.

Your guilty pleasure food?

Chocolate chip cookies and preferably Otis Spunkmeyer.

NOTE:  Dr Gibbs is a board certified, fellowship trained orthopedic surgeon at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates with a specialty in sports medicine.  You may read his professional bio by visiting our website or clicking here. SOA has 13 physicians in four locations (Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton) and offers same day appointments when needed.

Powerful TLC for Your Feet and Ankles

Eric James, MD is a Fellowship Trained orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates. He specializes in foot and ankle advanced techniques and reconstruction of complex foot deformities. Dr James shares with us the importance of not neglecting our feet … they need a workout as much as the rest of our body!

happy foot

Stretch, Stretch, Stretch

Many common conditions affecting the foot and ankle can be attributed to, or worsened by, having a tight calf muscle. A large percentage of people have overly tight calf muscles and could benefit from a daily stretching routine. I prefer the runner’s stretch where the leg being stretched is straight behind you with the heel on the ground. This is done for varying periods of time, but I generally encourage a long, deep stretch.

calf stretch

Use the Little Muscles

The small muscles in our feet are often neglected and as they weaken, so does our foot’s ability to maintain correct alignment. Keep your feet strong by using them frequently. I recommend using the toes to pick up and grab objects off the floor. Spare sock on the ground? Grab it with your toes and avoid having to bend over while providing a work out for your feet.

Wear the Right Shoes

Finding the right pair of shoes can be challenging but makes a big difference in your foot health. Make sure you plan to try on shoes later in the day when your foot has done any swelling so you don’t end up buying shoes that are too small. Wear activity appropriate shoes. Try to limit high heel wear and shoes that are too small or pointy in the toe box. These shoes can lead to numerous problems like foot pain, bunions, hammertoes and neuromas.

Check Your Feet

It is a good idea to do a check on your feet daily when you shower or bathe. Check for any skin irritation, blistering, or other abnormalities. This is particular important if you have diabetes or neuropathy (loss or abnormal sensation) in the feet.

Our feet and ankles are very important and we need to keep them healthy! Let us know if we can help in maintaining your foot and ankle health!

NOTE: Eric James, MD is one of 13 physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates treating conditions of the joints, spine, and muscles. We offer same day appointments when needed. Call 941-951-2663 for an appointment at any of our four locations: Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, or Bradenton.

Thumbs Up for Dr Gregory Farino

Farino 2015 lab coat half

This interview marks the halfway point in chatting with our physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates. Dr Gregory Farino, a Fellowship Trained and Board Certified orthopedic surgeon, has a specialty in hand and wrist conditions. Take a look at what inspires Dr Farino and what he does in an occasional spare moment:

What inspired you to become a physician?

I wanted to do something in the sciences where I could be useful and helpful to others. Initially during college, I was going to be a teacher but after spending some time with a few different MDs, decided to pursue medicine.

Why orthopedics?

As a medical student, I thought I would pursue primary care but after rotating through, sensed it wasn’t the right fit for me. I decided to try orthopedics in my 4th year of med school. I did a rotation at Einstein hospital in Philadelphia and worked with a great group of guys. They let me do an entire surgery and I was hooked. I decided to apply for an orthopedic residency.

What do you love most about your job?

Obviously the job is challenging in many ways but I enjoy knowing that the things I do and decisions I make translate into another person feeling better and functioning better. It is satisfying to know all of the time and effort I spent in training allows me to do something useful, not just for myself, but for everyone I see.

What is your biggest challenge?

Dealing with imperfection. I don’t handle failure well at all. I expect 100% success with what I do. Logically, I know it’s not possible but I expect it anyway. That creates unhappiness for me when things turn out less than my expectation.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a ____________.

I’m not sure. Maybe a college professor in history.

Your proudest moment?

I have to say my proudest moment was probably the day I matched in orthopedics at Penn State. It was my first choice and the culmination of 8 years of really hard work.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled? Why?

Sicily. It has everything: food, wine, beautiful vistas (the sea, mountains, an active volcano), fascinating history and great people.

Any hobbies? Activities?

I like to read mostly ancient Greek history and early American history. I am teaching myself to play the guitar and ukulele.

What’s your next adventure?

I usually have a trip planned but don’t at this time. I would love to go back to Italy.

Your guilty pleasure food?

It’s a tie: pizza and French fries.

 NOTE:  Dr Farino, MD is one of 13 physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates. He is Fellowship Trained and Board Certified with a hand/wrist specialty. You may read his medical biography and CV by clicking here. SOA offers four locations (Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton), and provides same day appointments when needed. Our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

One-on-One with Trevor Born, MD

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The past few weekly blogs have provided insight to our physicians on a personal level with our one-on-one interviews.  This week, we sit down with Trevor Born, MD, who is Fellowship Trained in Sports Medicine. Dr Born is a Bradenton native with impressive local accolades and we’re so pleased he returned to Florida after completing his medical education.

What inspired you to become a physician?

A couple reasons: Seeing the positive role physicians have in their patients’ lives, including my family members. Also knowing that physicians are constantly challenged and driven to continue the learning process not only for themselves but to further advance their patient care abilities.

Why orthopedics?

Why not? I was mainly drawn to orthopedics from my love for sports. I always thought, “Man, how awesome would it be to be the team doc for the Gators?” Coupled with the fact that building, architecture, and math were always passions of mine, the decision to pursue Orthopedics was a pretty easy one for me to make.

What do you love most about your job?

Establishing relationships with patients as I treat them for their chronic conditions or as they proceed on their journey to recovery from a serious injury. That about sums it up.

What is your biggest challenge?

Following Gator sports too much and their recent struggles? Really though, the most difficult struggle in today’s medical landscape is finding more time to care for and get to know my patients.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be an ________

Architect, teacher, or musician.

Your proudest moment?

That would be whenever I receive a letter from a patient or their family members letting me know how thankful they were for the care I provided.  Not many other moments out there make me feel as thankful and proud of my role as a physician.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled?  Why?

Yellowstone National Park. The natural wonders and wildlife, scenery, volatile terrain, and how much of it is still truly unknown makes it pretty interesting in my mind.

Any hobbies?  Activities?

Guitar/music as I have been playing since middle school and there is never a party that could not benefit from a little guitar. When I have the chance I like following Gator sports and continuing to play golf, basketball, and tennis.

What’s your next adventure?

Starting a family.

Your guilty pleasure food?

Dark chocolate.

NOTE: Trevor Born, MD is Fellowship Trained in Sports Medicine with a specialty in upper and lower extremities. You may read his professional medical biography by clicking here.  Dr Born is one of 13 SOA physicians in four locations (Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton). Sarasota Orthopedic Associates offers same day appointments when needed.  Our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

INSPIRATION JUST AHEAD — Meet Dr Kim Furman

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The fifth in our series of getting to know our SOA physicians on a personal level features Dr Kim Furman, Fellowship Trained and Board Re-Certified Orthopedic physician.  Dr Furman specializes in hip and knee joint replacements, and there’s an inspirational side of him you may not know.  Read about it here:

What inspired you to become a physician?

Great question but difficult to answer.  Since age 9 while growing up in Brooklyn, I wanted to go into medicine. Perhaps I was influenced by my next door neighbor, who was general physician, as well as my childhood pediatrician, who made house calls, when I was sick.  Surprisingly, my parents never directed me to the medical field but fully supported my decision.

Why orthopedics?

Several factors influenced my decision for Orthopedics.

As a kid, I was always working with my Dad in his basement workshop, building and repairing all sorts of stuff.  I was mechanically inclined and loved working with my hands.

For 7 years, while in college and medical school, I was an operating room technician at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center. I had the opportunity to work with all the surgical specialties.  I was fascinated by reconstructive plastic surgery and this became my initial focus.  During that time I suffered a traumatic knee injury.  A close friend of my family was an orthopedic surgeon.  He took care of my knee injury and had a significant impact on redirecting my focus to orthopedics.

While continuing work at Columbia Presbyterian, I rotated through orthopedics.  It was at that point that my decision for orthopedics was solidified.  I loved all the neat tools that were used.  Working on fixing fractures was just like woodworking I did as a kid and continue to do now.

Unfortunately, I suffered numerous complications from my knee injury and seven surgical procedures later resulted in significant knee arthritis.  My personal experience with my injury, multiple surgeries, and arthritis has given me an inside view of the problems of my patients.  I can empathize easily with them.

What do you love most about your job?       SOAStudio-170

The gratification I get from returning a patient to a pain free life style.

What is your biggest challenge?

The ever changing medical environment (insurance, government intrusion) that has taken away the true art of medicine and has made it a business.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be an ________________.

Anthropologist/archaeologist

Your proudest moment? 

The birth of my 2 children.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled?  Why?

China, because of the incredible history and culture developments.

Any hobbies?  Activities?

Woodworking, gardening, fishing and traveling.   I was an avid softball, tennis, and paddleball player before my knee arthritis limited those activities.

What’s your next adventure?

A trip to the Antarctic.

Your guilty pleasure food?

Pepperoni pizza

NOTE:  Dr Kim Furman is  a Fellowship Trained and Board Re-Certified Orthopedic Surgeon. He specializes in the treatment of arthritic knees and hips and has been with Sarasota Orthopedic Associates for 30 years. You may read his medical CV by clicking HERE.  SOA treats both adults and children in four locations (Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton) and offers same day appointments when needed. For more about SOA, click HERE, or call 941-951-2663 for an appointment.

A CLOSER LOOK AT DR ERIC JAMES – Orthopedic Foot & Ankle Surgeon

dr james bday

In our ongoing series of SOA physician interviews, we’re getting an up close and personal look at each of our physicians.  This week, we asked Eric James, MD, orthopedic foot & ankle surgeon at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates, to answer some questions and share his thoughts with us.

What inspired you to become a physician?

In middle school I began shadowing a family friend who was an orthopedic surgeon. I found it to be very interesting and it really stuck with me. I studied engineering in college so I would have a broad background, but knew I wanted to work in orthopedics… so, here I am!

Why orthopedics?

I have always been more of a mechanically minded person and there is no better field than orthopedics for the mechanic/engineer/tinkerer. A lot of what we do on a daily basis is correcting biomechanical abnormalities, so it really fit me well.

What do you love most about your job?

Seeing someone complete the process of healing and have an opportunity to get back to doing the things they love.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be an __________________.

Engineer, programmer, product designer, something in the technology field.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled?  Why?

Costa Rica for a surfing trip before college started. We spent a good deal of time immersed in the culture and I have a lot of great memories from that trip

Any hobbies?  Activities?

I enjoy being outside and particularly on the water. I grew up surfing, fishing and diving, so I am starting to get back into some of that. I just took up paddle boarding, which is a lot of fun and great exercise too!

What’s your next adventure?

I am in the process of getting recertified for diving and I am looking to get back into spearfishing. Otherwise, I am looking forward to a relaxing vacation as season winds down!

Your guilty pleasure food?

Mint chocolate chip ice cream

Note: Eric James, MD is a fellowship trained orthopedic foot & ankle surgeon at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates.  You may read his professional biography  and watch his video on our website here. SOA has four locations in Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton and we offer same day appointments when needed. For an appointment with Dr James or any of our 13 physicians, please call 941-951-2663.  Our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

GETTING TO KNOW YOU – Paul Lento, MD

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Last week we featured Dr Michael Gordon. This week, we asked the same questions of Paul Lento, MD, a triple board certified Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation physician here at SOA.

What inspired you to become a physician?

Not so much “what” but “who”.  My father had a pretty strong influence on my decision. He often talked that I should choose a career to help improve people’s lives but was also challenging. I thought medicine would be the best avenue to achieve both of these goals.

Why Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R)?

While I was a General Medical Officer in the Navy taking care of Marines, I realized most of the personnel I saw had non-surgical orthopedic injuries, which often improved with a good rehabilitation program. PM&R focuses on several non-surgical options while treating the entire person, not just one body part.

What do you love most about your job?

Probably learning about the interesting things my patients have done in life. I have seen patients who have played professional tennis to those who taught Vivien Leigh how to talk with a southern drawl. One patient of mine was a bomber pilot in WWII.  Truly amazing people.

(Editorial Note: For the “younger” folks, Vivien Leigh was best known for her two Academy Award winning roles from classic movies as Scarlet O’Hara in “Gone With The Wind” and Blanche DuBois in “Streetcar Named Desire”.)

What is your biggest challenge?

Explaining to patients that I’m not an orthopedic physician. People look at me like I must be from another planet. The specialty of PM&R is very small and not well-known but I chose it as I think it has a lot to offer patients.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a _____________.

Fishing boat captain or a bartender on a beach in St. Barths.  Who knows, maybe combine the two when I retire?

Your proudest moment?

The times when I see my kids being kind to other people.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled?  Why?

While I’ve been to different countries, I would have to say Salt Lake City during the 2002 Winter Olympics. I saw and met people from all over the world. It was like circling the globe in two weeks without having to leave the U.S.

Any hobbies?  Activities?

I love to fish. I would try to fish in any body of water if given the chance. It’s one of the reasons I moved to Florida.

What’s your next adventure?

I may explore Italy in the next year or two if I can get away.

Your guilty pleasure food?

Having lived in both Chicago and Philadelphia, I would have to say deep dish pizza and soft pretzels.

Paul Lento, MD is triple board certified and a Castle Connelly “Top Doc”.  You may read his medical biography by visiting our website here. To make an appointment with Dr Lento, call 941-951-2663. Sarasota Orthopedic Associates has 13 physicians across 4 locations (Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton) and we offer same day appointments when needed. Our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

GETTING TO KNOW YOU –Michael Gordon, MD

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Over the next several weeks we’ll be asking each of our physicians to reveal a more personal side that extends beyond their medical biography. This week, we spoke with Dr Michael Gordon, who is Fellowship Trained and Board Certified in treating hands, wrists, shoulders, and elbows and sees adults and children of all ages.

What inspired you to become a physician?

I wanted to be able to help people in a tangible and meaningful way. I enjoyed creating and tinkering with and fixing things as a child. You could say I was the neighborhood mechanic. I even built a boat with my father as a summer project.

Why orthopedics?

It’s most similar to architecture, mechanics, and carpentry, and, provides gratification of fixing or restoring function to the anatomy. When I considered applying to medical school, I shadowed an orthopedic surgeon and watched him return the ability of walking to people. It was very inspiring.

What do you love most about your job?

Seeing the faces of joy and gratitude when patients have recovered from their injury or condition.

What is your biggest challenge?

Not having enough time.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a ________.

Rock Star

Editorial Note:  Dr Gordon plays guitar and sings in the band “McDreamy and the Anatomy”, a group consisting solely of physicians! The band competed at the “DR IDOL” fundraising event for Boys & Girls Club a few years ago when they rocked the crowd and won the title.

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Your proudest moment?

Becoming and being a father to two amazing daughters.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled?  Why?

I’m not fond of trying to name the “best”, “favorite”, or “most” because there are so many great places. I would say Thailand, Japan, and Israel were culturally interesting, but Europe is wonderful too. The US has amazing resources that we sometimes forget like the Grand Canyon and Yosemite.

Any hobbies?  Activities?

Music, Music, Music. Exercise has also become a central part of my life.

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What’s your next adventure?

I’d like to make it to the Great Barrier Reef for scuba diving. I haven’t made definite plans, but it’s on my list. Also the Red Sea.

Your guilty pleasure food?

Cheetos.

You can read Dr Gordon’s professional biography by clicking here.  Michael Gordon, MD is one of thirteen physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates.  With three locations and same day appointments, our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

CHECK THESE ORTHOPEDIC “A to Z’s” … How many do you know?

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At times, orthopedic terms can sound like a foreign language. We thought it would be fun to compile a list of one orthopedic term for each letter of the alphabet. Take a look and see if you’ve heard of these:

  • Arthroscopy – a minimally invasive surgical procedure on a joint where an exam and/or treatment is performed through a tiny incision.
  • Bursa – a fluid filled sac providing a cushion between bone and tendons or muscles.
  • Cubital Tunnel Syndrome – pressure on the ulnar nerve (better known as your funny bone), one of the main nerves of the hand.
  • DOMS – Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness, or pain and stiffness felt several hours after strenuous exercising.
  • Eccentric – the motion of a muscle as it is lengthening; the opposite of concentric, or shortening.
  • Fascia – a sheet of connective tissue below the skin that separates muscles or organs.
  • Gout – most commonly affected at the big toe, inflammatory arthritis caused by elevated uric acid in the blood; more prevalent in men.
  • Heterotopic Ossification – the presence of bone in soft tissue where it would not normally exist.
  • Impingement Syndrome – when the tendons of the rotator cuff muscles become irritated, resulting in pain, weakness, and loss of shoulder movement.
  • Jones Fracture – occurs in the small area of the small toe that is prone to healing challenges due to less blood flow.
  • Kyphosis – abnormally convex curvature of the spine.
  • Lordosis – the inward curvature of the spine.
  • Meniscus – tissue that serves to disperse friction in the knee joint when moving.
  • Neuropathy – disease or dysfunction of nerves (sensory, motor or autonomic) causing numbness or weakness.
  • Osteoarthritis – the most common form of arthritis occurring when the protective cartilage wears down.
  • Plantar Fasciitis – a disorder of the heel and bottom of the foot causing pain, usually upon taking first steps of the day or after a rest.
  • Q -?
  • Referred Pain – pain perceived in a location different from that of the pathology.
  • Strain vs Sprain – partial tear of a muscle vs partial or complete tear of a ligament.
  • Tendinitis vs Tendinosis – “itis” occurs when the body detects an injury and responds with increased blood flow to the tendon; “osis” is a degenerative injury with repetitive stress over time.
  • Ultrasound – sound waves with ultra- high frequencies above the limit of hearing, allowing resolution of small internal details in tissue.
  • Viscosupplementation – a procedure where a fluid, hyaluronate, is injected into the joint to provide relief and movement.
  • W Sitting (pediatric) – a sitting position discouraged in children causing abnormal stress on hips and knees during growth.
  • X-rays – electromagnetic waves that are able pass through a part of the body to show internal composition, shown as a photographic or digital image.
  • Y – ?
  • Zika – a once rare mosquito born disease; though not orthopedic, the bite can cause joint pain; currently ranking high in the news as it spreads into several countries including USA.

So, how many did you already know? Do you have an orthopedic related term for the missing letters ”Q” or “Y”?

Sarasota Orthopedic Associates offers same day appointments at our three locations of Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, and Venice.  Our 13 physicians are committed to get you back on your feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

IS TECHNOLOGY DE-HUMANIZING US?

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No one can deny technology has made us smarter, more efficient, and even healthier.  Medical technology allows for early detection. The internet gives us instant access to news and information. But whatever happened to human contact?  We have become so wrapped up in the convenience of technology, we’ve lost the pleasure of interpersonal, social relationships. Our “plates” (don’t you hate that phrase?) are so full, we’re constantly seeking the fastest way to communicate and move along to our next task.

We are now more wired than ever. Researchers from the University of Glasgow found that half their study participants reported checking their email once an hour, while some individuals check up to 30 to 40 times an hour. An AOL study revealed that 59 percent of PDA users check every single time an email arrives and a whopping 83 percent check email every day while on vacation.

technology dehumanizing

Consider this:

  • Texting is now an art of abbreviations. Our spelling skills and grammar are going the way of the dinosaur.
  • Smart phones are now labeled “walking hazards”.
  • Our phones are next to our forks at the dinner table.
  • Many states have stopped teaching cursive, citing it as unnecessary. What happened to “thank you” notes to Grandma and Grandpa?
  • Have you been to a meeting with everyone looking at their phones? How does that make the speaker feel? Unimportant? Probably.
  • Next door neighbor children now play video games in their own homes rather than walk twenty feet outside and play with each other.
  • The population of Facebook is higher than that of China or India.
  • More people own a mobile device than a toothbrush. Read that again: scary, right?
  • Grandparents are the fastest growing demographic on Twitter, famous for its limitation of 140 characters per tweet.
  • We now have wearable technology on our wrists!

The statistics are scary. According to a recent study conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation, children today spend up to 75 hours a week using technology gadgets. That’s 75 hours of time spent plugged into iPods, watching TV, using the Internet, and escaping into the world of video games.

Old fashioned criticisms? Maybe, but are we taking the easy way out and unplugging from human contact? Sherry Turkle, a media scholar who wrote “Alone Together” and “Reclaiming Conversation” claims that “the flight from conversation undermines our relationships, our creativity, and our productivity”.  She believes that the ability to text and email allow us to edit our personalities and control how we want to be perceived, rather than who we really are.  Take a few minutes and listen to her on TedTalks at https://www.ted.com/talks/sherry_turkle_alone_together?language=en#t-406314  

Human emotion is powerful and can’t be interpreted correctly through a text or email. Our body language, facial cues, and tone of voice all contribute to the conversation; when those elements are missing, it’s easy to be offended by a misunderstood remark or even a typo. Our smart phones are slowly driving us into isolation and while smiley faces on our phones are cute, they don’t convey the beauty of a smile or the sadness of real tears. Nothing replaces a mom’s hug, a shared memory, a family outing, reuniting with an old friend, touch and consolation when needed, or working out solutions in person via conversation.

Nearly two years ago, Scott Dockter, president and CEO of PBD Worldwide Fulfillment Services Inc., decided to take Casual Friday one step further, and created email-free Fridays, where employees are encouraged to talk offline to resolve issues, by picking up the phone or meeting face-to-face. As a result, he saw an 80 percent email drop-off in the first year and noticed a reduction of unnecessary reports sent and excessive cc’ing.

Here’s a challenge: Is it possible for us to go on an email/texting “diet”? Is it possible to feed our souls instead with human contact for an hour a day? Try it … you may be surprised how good it makes you feel. What are YOUR thoughts?

dehuman