Tag Archives: Dr Julie Barre

PREVENTING SPORTS INJURIES IN CHILDREN

Child-falling Injury on the soccer field

Youngsters are particularly prone to sports-related injuries, but there are steps coaches and parents can take to keep young athletes healthy and active.

Children love playing sports, whether on organized teams or in neighborhood pickup games. In fact, more than 46 million children participate in sports each year, with most reaping the benefits of physical activity and teamwork. But with so many youngsters participating in these activities, there will inevitably be some injuries. In fact, one in three children playing team sports faces an injury serious enough to be benched. But most injuries are preventable, and knowledge is key to prevention.

Benefits of Participating in Sports

sports

In addition to keeping kids in shape, sports also improve coordination, self-esteem, and discipline. Team sports also promote teamwork, a valuable skill not always learned in the classroom, and cooperation with others. And while losing isn’t easy, it’s important for kids to learn how to accept defeat and try again. Many children become close friends with their teammates and learn valuable social and communication skills.

Sporting Hazards

cheerleader knee injury

For most youngsters, the benefits of sports far outweigh the risks, but children are still growing, and injuries can impact them more than they would an adult. Muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bones are rather susceptible to injury, and sudden trauma like twists, falls, or collisions can lead to more than just a bruised knee; sports medicine physicians often see injuries like strains and sprains, broken bones, and growth plate injuries that affect bone growth. Overuse can also cause injuries when kids practice too long or too hard without adequate rest in between exercise sessions.

Preventing Sports Injuries

There are a number of steps parents and coaches can take to ensure kids remain safe on the field or court. The first is proper age-appropriate physical conditioning and training to ensure children are in good shape before joining the team. This conditioning should also incorporate  stretching techniques and adequate warm-up exercises for their particular sport. Protective gear is also a must, and kids should be given a lesson in how to properly use or adjust helmets, padding, mouthpieces, protective eyewear, and other safety equipment.

Too often young athletes are playing only one sport all year long without the potential for rest or recovery. Sports medicine specialists now understand that this is not a healthy strategy. In fact, young athletes who play or perform a single sport greater than eight months out of the year are at a significantly increased risk of experiencing an injury compared to the other youths who participate in different sports. Playing only one sport may overload developing structures causing overuse injuries.

Creating a Supportive Atmosphere

Children can also feel pressure to win, so it’s vital to their emotional health that parents and coaches foster a supportive atmosphere, emphasizing teamwork and sportsmanship over winning. When children are properly cared for physically and emotionally by their coaches, they’re a lot less likely to face severe injury and stress.

If your child has been experiencing pain during sports or other concerning symptoms, call Sarasota Orthopedic Associates at 941-951-2663 to schedule an appointment. You may also schedule an appointment through our website. Our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

DO YOU HAVE RUNNER’S KNEE?

RUNNERS

Avid runners can experience pain for a number of reasons, from simple trauma (banging the leg against something) to muscle spasms (usually the result of improper stretching). When running and jogging are consistently painful, however, the problem could be runner’s knee. Exercise enthusiasts should always pay attention to pain and respond accordingly. Before panicking over persistent knee pain, however, it’s important to understand what runner’s knee is and how to recognize it.

Recognizing Runner’s Knee

Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), the medical term for runner’s knee, is a persistent irritation localized at the juncture of the patella and femur—the “top” side of the kneecap. It’s commonly associated with running and jogging, hence its lay name. PFPS is characterized by a dull knee pain that sufferers describe as “behind” or “around” the top of the kneecap.

Exercise and activity can aggravate runner’s knee injuries, particularly when the direction is downhill such as descending stairs or running on a decline. Squatting and sitting for long periods can also be problematic for people dealing with PFPS. There is likely also knee pain associated with resisting leg extensions. The kneecap itself may be adversely sensitive to pressure.

PFPS vs. Patellar Tendonitis

As noted above, PFPS produces pain localized on the upper side of the kneecap. If the pain manifests “inside” or “below” the kneecap, the condition in question is more likely patellar tendonitis—an inflammation of the tendon connecting the patella to the shin muscle. Patellar tendonitis results from a different kind of injury than does PFPS, though the only sure way to get a diagnosis is by meeting with a certified doctor, preferably an orthopedist.

Misconceptions About PFPS

PFPS can strike anyone who actively and/or aggressively uses the legs and knees for work or recreation. While less common among active children, there is a higher tendency for this kind of knee pain among women runners. The reasons for this correlation remain unclear; however, recent research has disproven the so-called “Q-angle” theory that the wider hips of female physiology render women more susceptible to runner’s knee.

In the last decade, science focused on PFPS has discovered that the knee actually moves differently during runs or squats than it seems to the person exercising. Although it feels like the kneecap “tracks” outward when running or squatting, it’s actually the femur that is rotating above and around the patella. This fact explains why PFPS sufferers generally also have weakened hip abductor and external rotator muscles. In fact, the most successful physical therapy regimens for runner’s knee all involve strengthening these muscles to help stabilize knee movement and reduce irritation.

Sarasota Orthopedic Associates offers customized pain management treatment plans for runners and athletes throughout the Gulf Coast of Florida. Fill out our contact form to schedule your appointment today.

With three convenient locations we are able to offer same/next day appointments when needed.  Like us on Facebook here. Follow us on Twitter here.

GOLF – Relaxation or Frustration?

golf-swing

For many people, the game of golf is a conundrum … a game of frustration and/or one of relaxation. It takes commitment, practice, and patience to make the game enjoyable. Unfortunately, all that practice may lead to stress on parts of the body, particularly the shoulder. Even professionals may experience a golf injury of this type. Injury may come for any number of factors including poor swing, incorrect set up/follow through, overly robust swing, improper grip, and overuse.

These repetitive factors may contribute to a common shoulder injury of tendinitis, bursitis, or even a tear in the rotator cuff. Pain may not be felt immediately during play, but rather the night after or when lifting arms overhead. Often times, the discomfort is felt just below the shoulder in the upper arm.

Fortunately there are simple methods to prevent a shoulder injury. Since most injuries are from overuse and improper form, the first and foremost prevention is to rest between playing.

  • If you are experiencing discomfort from a daily round of golf, limit yourself to every other day allowing your shoulder time to recover.
  • Support your muscles with eccentric (lengthening or the “negative”) motions to build strength on your “off” days.
  • Proper warm ups and stretches will help decrease injuries.
  • Learn proper mechanics to decrease the swing force on your shoulder (the most powerful generator of the swing comes from the hips so when mechanics are good this will decrease stress on the shoulders).
  • Enlist the assistance of a professional to correct your mechanics. The bonus? An improved game!

Assuming you’ve done all you can to prevent an injury yet you do sustain a shoulder injury, what’s the best course of treatment?

  • Rest, rest, rest; it’s extremely important to allow the shoulder sufficient time to heal prior to getting back on the course. Do NOT play when you are in pain or you will exacerbate the shoulder trauma.
  • Icing on and off for a day will help with swelling and may provide relief.
  • Anti-inflammatories, or NSAIDs, may ease the discomfort. These should be used only for a limited time.
  • If your discomfort continues longer than a week and/or persists at night, it’s time to consult a physician.

When pain persists for an extended period of time, an orthopedic sports medicine physician will be able determine the cause and amount of damage. Clinical examination, X-rays and/or an MRI will provide a closer look and valuable data on the best course of treatment. We may prescribe physical therapy or a cortisone injection. If surgery is required, surgical advancements have progressed allowing us to utilize minimally invasive techniques such as arthroscopy.

Julie Gladden Barré, MD is a Fellowship Trained/Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon with a specialty in Sports Medicine at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates. Our commitment is to get patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life. Like us on Facebook here. Follow us on Twitter here.

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL WITH JULIE GLADDEN BARRE, MD

We are so proud to introduce you to Orthopedic Surgeon, Julie Gladden Barre, MD.  Dr. Barre has a specialty in Sports Medicine and treats all ages from high school athletes to  couch potatoes to weekend warriors to professional athletes. You may find her professional bio on our website, however, we wanted to  spend a few minutes with Dr. Barre and get to know her on a more personal level.  Read about it here:

Barre headshot color

What inspired you to become a physician?

Since I was very young I have always had compassion for those in need and this carried into my initial professional calling as a physical therapist. I loved helping people who had been through an injury or surgery and eventually when drawn into management, my love of patient care continued to lure me back to hands on treatment of those in need. I then decided to return to school and become a physician.

Why orthopedics?

With my unique background as a therapist I understood the process of those who were injured requiring surgery and the often grueling process required to get back to what brings someone joy in life. The human body and the increasing active lifestyle of people in today’s world is what has always fascinated me and propelled my love of Orthopedics.

What do you love most about your job?

I love meeting people every day and finding out about their lives and occupations. My job is so satisfying and I thoroughly enjoy being able to help get people back on their feet again as well as help them get back to their normal activities of daily living or get back on the field or golf course or tennis court.

What is your biggest challenge?

One of the hardest things to deal with in the field of medicine is when tragedy happens and seeing people go through physical and emotional pain. As a physician it is hard not to feel the pain that patients and their loved ones go through. I like to encourage my patients and establish a team approach so that I am with them every step of the process.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a_______.

I can’t imagine not being a physician, however if I had to choose something it would be a chef. Everyone loves food and I thoroughly enjoy pleasing people through creativity in the kitchen.

Your proudest / happiest moment?

I think my proudest and happiest moment is when I had my son during the 4th year of my orthopedic residency. Residency is a grueling time in life and after going through a full 9 month pregnancy during residency, the morning my son was born was one of the most joyful times in my life.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled? Why?

Guatemala. I helped a medical team during a medical mission trip in college and I was so moved by the people in Central America and how grateful they were for the medical care they received.

Any hobbies? Activities?

Beach activities with family, cooking, travel, attending sporting events, exercise.

 What’s your next adventure?

I would love to take a trip to Europe with my family someday.

Your guilty pleasure food?

A really good coffee and French pastry.

Dr Barre is aligned with the mission of Sarasota Orthopedic Associates to get her patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.  SOA has three locations and offers same day or next appointments when needed. Check the website at www.SOA.md or call 941-951-BONE (2663) for more information.