Tag Archives: Dr Jeffrey Silverstein

KNEE PAIN? Get Back In The Game

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To the casual observer the sport of golf may seem a relaxing, calm respite from daily routine, however nothing is farther from the truth. Today in the U.S. there are over 25 million golfers and 15-20% of them will experience some form of golf injury. Of those, 80% will be from overuse and improper form. Worse, 50% of golf injuries will become chronic.

Low back pain is cited as the #1 complaint from golfers; however knee pain takes its toll on golfers as a very common ailment. This is hardly a surprise when you realize the sport requires excessive rotation of the knee as well as disproportionate force during your swing. When simply walking you are distributing your body weight evenly. In golf, the principal hazard to the knee is on the downswing when the forward knee experiences 4 ½ times your body weight and the opposite knee 3 ½ times. For example, a right handed golfer of 180 pounds will place 810 pounds of weight onto their left knee from a powerful downswing. This process repeated over 18 holes places a heavy burden on the knees, particularly the left knee.

One of the more common knee injuries we see in golfers is a meniscus tear. The meniscus is a shock absorber, with one located on either side of the knee to help evenly distribute weight across the knee. When a meniscus is torn, you may have pain, swelling, or stiffness, and may find yourself suddenly off balance from your knee “giving out”. Golf activity may exacerbate a pre-existing tear.

So, how can you prevent or limit injury to continue enjoying your game? Here are some tips:

  • If you haven’t golfed for an extended period of time, don’t jump back into the game. Ease in slowly.
  • Perform appropriate warm ups with stretching, including calves, to diminish risk of injury.
  • To stabilize your knees, keep your lower back and hip muscles strengthened with proper and regular exercises; see your physical therapist or golf coach for tips.
  • Increase your overall flexibility.
  • Use a ball retriever instead of bending at the knees to pick up your ball.
  • Decrease the frequency of your games when you have knee discomfort. If you typically golf 3 or 4 times a week, reduce that to once or twice. Rest between games. Repeating the same activity every day will intensify your condition.
  • A knee brace during play may help lessen discomfort.
  • Ice your knees for 10-15 minutes after 18 holes.
  • If you’ve had knee surgery, it is critical to follow your physical therapy protocol and receive clearance from your physician.

Jeffrey Silverstein, MD is a Fellowship Trained and Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon with a specialty in hip and knee joint reconstruction. At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.  Fore!

BACK TO LIFE: MANAGING YOUR HIP PAIN

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Hip pain is a very common complaint we hear from patients at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates. A decrease in mobility may make your daily activity problematic, depending on the severity. Did you know hip pain stems from many different causes?

We typically think of a broken hip as a condition suffered by the elderly, however hip fractures can occur in younger patients, particularly from a traumatic injury such as a serious fall, sports injury, or auto accident. These injuries may also involve labral tears, impingement, avascular necrosis (loss of blood to the bone), bursitis, and muscle tears.

The most common condition we see as a cause of hip pain is osteoarthritis (OA), also known as degenerative joint disease. This is the wear and tear of the joints occurring when the cartilage (or cushion) between joints breaks down. Characteristic indicators of OA might be pain, stiffness, swelling, and/or loss of mobility. Currently there is no cure for arthritis, however there are many ways to help manage it.

hip pain

Whether trauma or arthritis, at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates we begin with a comprehensive evaluation to ensure an accurate diagnosis. Typically we you will have a digital x-ray taken on-site in our office at your first appointment. Having on-site technology allows for a prompt diagnosis. Knowing the exact problem is essential to determining the best treatment options for you.

In the case of a less serious hip injury, Physical Therapy may be all that’s needed to extend your range of motion and manage your condition. PT and regular low impact exercise, such as bike riding or walking, may strengthen your muscles and help relieve discomfort in the joints. NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) or aspirin may be helpful, although should not be used on a long term basis. Other options include cortisone injections and PRP (platelet rich plasma) however, PRP is not a covered benefit of insurance and there is currently not enough scientific data to validate its effectiveness. It is important to know that nothing currently will regrow cartilage nor correct alignment.

hip injection

If measures to alleviate hip pain fail, you may want to explore a discussion with us about hip replacement surgery. You may be surprised to learn that hip replacement surgery can mean a relative quick recovery time. Everyone is unique so your timeline could be longer or shorter depending on individual circumstances. You will likely be in the hospital for about three days. A day or two after surgery you will start moving with assistance. Physical therapy will be fundamental to an optimal recovery. After 12 weeks, you may be able to resume normal activity under consent from your surgeon. In every case, it’s vitally important to discuss your situation with a skilled surgeon and listen closely to their advice.

The team of physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates are experts in diagnosing and treating your condition. We have four convenient locations (Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton) and are able to accommodate same day appointments when needed. Cal us at 941-951-2663 for an appointment or click HERE to view our website.

Sources: SOA website; WebMD; Arthritis Foundation; American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.

BAD TO THE BONE: Treating Knee Pain

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The knee is a very complex joint with many components making it vulnerable to a variety of injuries. When damaged, it can seriously impact your quality of life. Knee pain is one of the most common reasons people visit an orthopedic physician. Difficulty standing and walking can greatly diminish your sense of independence. The GOOD news is that most collective knee pain problems are treatable.

The CAUSES OF KNEE PAIN are many, including injury and disease. Injuries of the knee commonly seen tend to be damage to the anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, and the meniscus. There are an estimated 2.5 million sports-related injuries a year just by adolescent athletes alone. A fracture is most often caused by trauma such as a car accident, a fall, or sports contact; the most common broken bone in the knee is the patella, more generally known as the kneecap.

Fast facts on knee injuries:

  • The highest knee injury rates occur in people between the ages of 15 to 24.
  • Sports participation is a high risk factor for knee injuries.
  • 60% of high school sports-related injuries occur in the knee.
  • Female basketball and soccer athletes are as much as 8 times more likely to suffer an ACL injury than a male.
  • Young athletes suffering an ACL injury will have an increased risk of arthritis as they age.

Orthotics-for-knee-pain

Avoiding knee injuries:

  • Warm up properly prior to exercising or participating in sports.
  • Wear proper footwear with a good fit.
  • Don’t increase sports or exercise workouts suddenly.
  • Wear knee guards in sports activities.
  • Maintain strong, flexible leg muscles.
  • Always, always, always … Use a seatbelt when driving.

The MOST WIDESPREAD DISEASE affecting the knee is arthritis, which is caused by the gradual wearing-away of cartilage. Primary symptoms are pain, swelling, and stiffness in the knee. Currently, there is no “cure” for arthritis, however there are options, both surgical and non-invasive. Depending on the amount of arthritic damage, treating knee pain may often be done without surgery. These options may include one or a combination of physical therapy, weight control, injections, medications, bracing, exercise, and strengthening. When considering knee replacement surgery, the physicians and physical therapists at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates have a wide array of experience and expertise.

Whatever the cause of your knee pain, from sports injury to trauma to arthritis, the 13 physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates are here to help alleviate your discomfort. We have four convenient locations. Browse here to view our physicians and their specialties or call us at 941-951-2663 to make an appointment.

Sources: SOA.md website; MediLexicon International; arthritis.org; webMD