Tag Archives: board certified

SURGEON ON A MISSION

At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates, we believe in supporting our community in many ways and we encourage our staff to do so as well. Our spine surgeon, Dr Andrew Moulton, goes a step further and shares his skills globally to help children in developing countries. Our local newspaper recently interviewed him to learn more about his mission as co-founder of the Butterfly Foundation.  Read about it here:

Moulton Surgical Team

Dr. Andrew Moulton is a nationally recognized expert in the diagnosis and treatment of spinal disorders and a surgeon at Sarasota Orthopedics Associates. He is also the founder of the Butterfly Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of children with complex spinal deformity in developing countries.

Since 2003, Dr. Moulton has performed dozens of living-saving surgeries, while promoting the advancement of spine deformity treatment technology by training local surgeons. We spoke to him recently about his philanthropic work. Visit www.SOA.md for more information.

What inspired you to start the Butterfly Foundation?

As an orthopedic resident, I visited Honduras on a pediatric mission in which many club foot surgeries were performed. The next trip, there were more patients than before. I looked at the demographics and realized that the procedures themselves were a drop in the bucket compared to the size of the problem, and then decided to focus on training local surgeons. “Teach a man to fish and he feeds his community for a lifetime” is our motto.

Where are some of the places the foundation serves?

We have ongoing efforts in the Dominican Republic, Malawi, Chile, Peru, Jamaica, Vietnam, China and Myanmar.

What kind of spinal injuries or illnesses have you treated?

We treat primarily pediatric deformities, including spinal injuries and severe, life-threatening cases of scoliosis.

Moulton pt    Moulton spine film

Where did the name “Butterfly Foundation” come from?

Because of society’s attitudes toward their deformity, we saw how these kids would come in, bundled up, socially withdrawn, embarrassed, even outcast. Once they have their surgeries and heal, they stand up straight, they run, and they jump and play. There’s such a profound joy to see them move so freely, without pain. Their transformation reminded us of how a butterfly is born and the name stuck.

What was your most memorable case?

The most memorable case may have been one of the first very extensive ones. After a 15-hour surgery, with my hands bleeding from blisters acquired over the week of surgeries, I sat in a corner waiting over an hour for the patient to wake up to ensure she was not paralyzed from the surgery. She woke up in great shape. I slept well that night!

What inspires you to continue doing this work?

Doing this work takes me back to the basics of being a doctor — to why I wanted to become one in the first place. These people don’t have many chances in life. For me to give a little means a lot to them. When the people thank you, they really mean it. You’re the only chance they have.

How can our readers become involved with your foundation?

People are welcome to email inquiries to info@SOA.md.

Moulton photo

SOURCE: Herald Tribune/Style Magazine/Sunday, August 6, 2017

Link to article: http://sarasotaheraldtribune.fl.app.newsmemory.com/publink.php?shareid=0b1b06237

Butterfly Foundation Facebook Page

Meet Steven Page, MD – Sports Medicine Physician

Throughout last year we profiled all our physicians here at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates in a series of interviews. We were pleased to have Steven Page, MD join our SOA group late last year as  Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Physician.  This week, we posed those same questions to him so you might get to know him better.

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Dr Page, what inspired you to become a physician?

When I was in high school, I injured my ankle playing soccer. I went to see an orthopedic sports medicine doctor. He took great care of me and led me through a rehabilitation program that got me back to playing quickly so I didn’t have to miss the season.   I loved playing and being around sports.  I knew then I wanted to be a sports medicine doctor so I could take of people the way he took care of me.

Why orthopedics?

I really like that we can actually fix problems and get people back to doing the things they like to do.

What do you love most about your job?

I love that my patients are really motivated to get back to what they enjoy. When patients are engaged in their own care, we work together like a team to accomplish their goals.

What is your biggest challenge?

Finding a way to spend as much a time as I can with every patient while not making the next patient I see have to wait.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a __________________.

A veterinarian. I have two boxers and I absolutely love animals.

Your proudest moment?

A college football player that I did a knee surgery on during my fellowship is still playing in the NFL over 10 years later today. I am proud that I had a small part in enabling his success.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled? Why?

My favorite place visited is Maui, Hawaii. You can be on top of a volcano that looks like a Martian landscape in the morning and scuba diving with sea turtles in the afternoon.

Any hobbies? Activities?

I love to play sports and enjoy skiing and scuba diving. I get injured a little easier now as I get older so it helps me relate to my patients.

What’s your next adventure?

Becoming a father. I trained for years to be a surgeon, but I am totally unprepared for this.

Your guilty pleasure food?

French fries and macaroni and cheese. And I don’t feel guilty about it all!

Tablet with the text Sports medicine on the display

Whether you are a weekend warrior, professional athlete, or just a regular couch potato who overused those muscles and bones,  Dr Page sees patients of all  walks of life and all ages from pediatric to geriatric. If you’d like an evaluation, call 941-951-2663 or schedule an appointment with us online through our web page at www.SOA.md.   We have three locations and offer same day appointments. To keep up to date on everything at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates “like” us on Facebook HERE, or, follow us on Twitter HERE.

KNEE PAIN? Get Back In The Game

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To the casual observer the sport of golf may seem a relaxing, calm respite from daily routine, however nothing is farther from the truth. Today in the U.S. there are over 25 million golfers and 15-20% of them will experience some form of golf injury. Of those, 80% will be from overuse and improper form. Worse, 50% of golf injuries will become chronic.

Low back pain is cited as the #1 complaint from golfers; however knee pain takes its toll on golfers as a very common ailment. This is hardly a surprise when you realize the sport requires excessive rotation of the knee as well as disproportionate force during your swing. When simply walking you are distributing your body weight evenly. In golf, the principal hazard to the knee is on the downswing when the forward knee experiences 4 ½ times your body weight and the opposite knee 3 ½ times. For example, a right handed golfer of 180 pounds will place 810 pounds of weight onto their left knee from a powerful downswing. This process repeated over 18 holes places a heavy burden on the knees, particularly the left knee.

One of the more common knee injuries we see in golfers is a meniscus tear. The meniscus is a shock absorber, with one located on either side of the knee to help evenly distribute weight across the knee. When a meniscus is torn, you may have pain, swelling, or stiffness, and may find yourself suddenly off balance from your knee “giving out”. Golf activity may exacerbate a pre-existing tear.

So, how can you prevent or limit injury to continue enjoying your game? Here are some tips:

  • If you haven’t golfed for an extended period of time, don’t jump back into the game. Ease in slowly.
  • Perform appropriate warm ups with stretching, including calves, to diminish risk of injury.
  • To stabilize your knees, keep your lower back and hip muscles strengthened with proper and regular exercises; see your physical therapist or golf coach for tips.
  • Increase your overall flexibility.
  • Use a ball retriever instead of bending at the knees to pick up your ball.
  • Decrease the frequency of your games when you have knee discomfort. If you typically golf 3 or 4 times a week, reduce that to once or twice. Rest between games. Repeating the same activity every day will intensify your condition.
  • A knee brace during play may help lessen discomfort.
  • Ice your knees for 10-15 minutes after 18 holes.
  • If you’ve had knee surgery, it is critical to follow your physical therapy protocol and receive clearance from your physician.

Jeffrey Silverstein, MD is a Fellowship Trained and Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon with a specialty in hip and knee joint reconstruction. At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.  Fore!

BACK TO LIFE: MANAGING YOUR HIP PAIN

    hip pain woman

Hip pain is a very common complaint we hear from patients at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates. A decrease in mobility may make your daily activity problematic, depending on the severity. Did you know hip pain stems from many different causes?

We typically think of a broken hip as a condition suffered by the elderly, however hip fractures can occur in younger patients, particularly from a traumatic injury such as a serious fall, sports injury, or auto accident. These injuries may also involve labral tears, impingement, avascular necrosis (loss of blood to the bone), bursitis, and muscle tears.

The most common condition we see as a cause of hip pain is osteoarthritis (OA), also known as degenerative joint disease. This is the wear and tear of the joints occurring when the cartilage (or cushion) between joints breaks down. Characteristic indicators of OA might be pain, stiffness, swelling, and/or loss of mobility. Currently there is no cure for arthritis, however there are many ways to help manage it.

hip pain

Whether trauma or arthritis, at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates we begin with a comprehensive evaluation to ensure an accurate diagnosis. Typically we you will have a digital x-ray taken on-site in our office at your first appointment. Having on-site technology allows for a prompt diagnosis. Knowing the exact problem is essential to determining the best treatment options for you.

In the case of a less serious hip injury, Physical Therapy may be all that’s needed to extend your range of motion and manage your condition. PT and regular low impact exercise, such as bike riding or walking, may strengthen your muscles and help relieve discomfort in the joints. NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) or aspirin may be helpful, although should not be used on a long term basis. Other options include cortisone injections and PRP (platelet rich plasma) however, PRP is not a covered benefit of insurance and there is currently not enough scientific data to validate its effectiveness. It is important to know that nothing currently will regrow cartilage nor correct alignment.

hip injection

If measures to alleviate hip pain fail, you may want to explore a discussion with us about hip replacement surgery. You may be surprised to learn that hip replacement surgery can mean a relative quick recovery time. Everyone is unique so your timeline could be longer or shorter depending on individual circumstances. You will likely be in the hospital for about three days. A day or two after surgery you will start moving with assistance. Physical therapy will be fundamental to an optimal recovery. After 12 weeks, you may be able to resume normal activity under consent from your surgeon. In every case, it’s vitally important to discuss your situation with a skilled surgeon and listen closely to their advice.

The team of physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates are experts in diagnosing and treating your condition. We have four convenient locations (Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton) and are able to accommodate same day appointments when needed. Cal us at 941-951-2663 for an appointment or click HERE to view our website.

Sources: SOA website; WebMD; Arthritis Foundation; American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.

BAD TO THE BONE: Treating Knee Pain

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The knee is a very complex joint with many components making it vulnerable to a variety of injuries. When damaged, it can seriously impact your quality of life. Knee pain is one of the most common reasons people visit an orthopedic physician. Difficulty standing and walking can greatly diminish your sense of independence. The GOOD news is that most collective knee pain problems are treatable.

The CAUSES OF KNEE PAIN are many, including injury and disease. Injuries of the knee commonly seen tend to be damage to the anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, and the meniscus. There are an estimated 2.5 million sports-related injuries a year just by adolescent athletes alone. A fracture is most often caused by trauma such as a car accident, a fall, or sports contact; the most common broken bone in the knee is the patella, more generally known as the kneecap.

Fast facts on knee injuries:

  • The highest knee injury rates occur in people between the ages of 15 to 24.
  • Sports participation is a high risk factor for knee injuries.
  • 60% of high school sports-related injuries occur in the knee.
  • Female basketball and soccer athletes are as much as 8 times more likely to suffer an ACL injury than a male.
  • Young athletes suffering an ACL injury will have an increased risk of arthritis as they age.

Orthotics-for-knee-pain

Avoiding knee injuries:

  • Warm up properly prior to exercising or participating in sports.
  • Wear proper footwear with a good fit.
  • Don’t increase sports or exercise workouts suddenly.
  • Wear knee guards in sports activities.
  • Maintain strong, flexible leg muscles.
  • Always, always, always … Use a seatbelt when driving.

The MOST WIDESPREAD DISEASE affecting the knee is arthritis, which is caused by the gradual wearing-away of cartilage. Primary symptoms are pain, swelling, and stiffness in the knee. Currently, there is no “cure” for arthritis, however there are options, both surgical and non-invasive. Depending on the amount of arthritic damage, treating knee pain may often be done without surgery. These options may include one or a combination of physical therapy, weight control, injections, medications, bracing, exercise, and strengthening. When considering knee replacement surgery, the physicians and physical therapists at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates have a wide array of experience and expertise.

Whatever the cause of your knee pain, from sports injury to trauma to arthritis, the 13 physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates are here to help alleviate your discomfort. We have four convenient locations. Browse here to view our physicians and their specialties or call us at 941-951-2663 to make an appointment.

Sources: SOA.md website; MediLexicon International; arthritis.org; webMD

Time Out with Johnny Gibbs, MD

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Our weekly blogs have given us fascinating insight to the more personal side of our SOA physicians. This week we sat down with Johnny Gibbs, MD, a Fellowship Trained, Board Certified Sports Medicine Physician, and learned a bit more about what makes him tick.

What inspired you to become a physician?

I originally started my career as a physical therapist, and learning more about disease processes, I developed a strong interest in medicine.  During my first year as a physical therapist, a young patient of mine, Claire, passed away from what seemed to be medical complications of her disease.  She was a young woman, in her thirties, a single mother, and wonderful person.  I will never forget how helpless I felt over her passing and as a result, was compelled to pursue medicine to help improve patient outcomes.

Why orthopedics?

My original interest in sports medicine and rehabilitation was sparked when I was a patient myself during high school.  That, along with a background in physical therapy, made it an obvious decision for me.

What do you love most about your job?

I love that I’m able to give people their active life back and alleviate their pain.   And, of course, I love the detail and intricacy of operating!

Gibbs with girl in cast   Gibbs surgery

What is your biggest challenge?

Trying to meet patient expectations while dealing with the constantly evolving challenges of the healthcare environment is an enormous task. At times our hands may appear to be temporarily tied as a result of changes in healthcare and insurance. I want patients to know I am their advocate.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a __________________.

That’s easy … If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a football coach.

Your proudest moment?

Even easier answer … Becoming a father to my children.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled? Why?

Bamberg, Germany, a small picturesque town famous for its smoked beer. Why? It’s delicious!

Any hobbies? Activities?

I love sports, watching ESPN, exercising, golfing, and spending time outdoors with my children.

What’s your next adventure?

My wife and I are going on a European river cruise to celebrate her graduation from dermatolopathology training.

Your guilty pleasure food?

Chocolate chip cookies and preferably Otis Spunkmeyer.

NOTE:  Dr Gibbs is a board certified, fellowship trained orthopedic surgeon at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates with a specialty in sports medicine.  You may read his professional bio by visiting our website or clicking here. SOA has 13 physicians in four locations (Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton) and offers same day appointments when needed.

Thumbs Up for Dr Gregory Farino

Farino 2015 lab coat half

This interview marks the halfway point in chatting with our physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates. Dr Gregory Farino, a Fellowship Trained and Board Certified orthopedic surgeon, has a specialty in hand and wrist conditions. Take a look at what inspires Dr Farino and what he does in an occasional spare moment:

What inspired you to become a physician?

I wanted to do something in the sciences where I could be useful and helpful to others. Initially during college, I was going to be a teacher but after spending some time with a few different MDs, decided to pursue medicine.

Why orthopedics?

As a medical student, I thought I would pursue primary care but after rotating through, sensed it wasn’t the right fit for me. I decided to try orthopedics in my 4th year of med school. I did a rotation at Einstein hospital in Philadelphia and worked with a great group of guys. They let me do an entire surgery and I was hooked. I decided to apply for an orthopedic residency.

What do you love most about your job?

Obviously the job is challenging in many ways but I enjoy knowing that the things I do and decisions I make translate into another person feeling better and functioning better. It is satisfying to know all of the time and effort I spent in training allows me to do something useful, not just for myself, but for everyone I see.

What is your biggest challenge?

Dealing with imperfection. I don’t handle failure well at all. I expect 100% success with what I do. Logically, I know it’s not possible but I expect it anyway. That creates unhappiness for me when things turn out less than my expectation.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a ____________.

I’m not sure. Maybe a college professor in history.

Your proudest moment?

I have to say my proudest moment was probably the day I matched in orthopedics at Penn State. It was my first choice and the culmination of 8 years of really hard work.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled? Why?

Sicily. It has everything: food, wine, beautiful vistas (the sea, mountains, an active volcano), fascinating history and great people.

Any hobbies? Activities?

I like to read mostly ancient Greek history and early American history. I am teaching myself to play the guitar and ukulele.

What’s your next adventure?

I usually have a trip planned but don’t at this time. I would love to go back to Italy.

Your guilty pleasure food?

It’s a tie: pizza and French fries.

 NOTE:  Dr Farino, MD is one of 13 physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates. He is Fellowship Trained and Board Certified with a hand/wrist specialty. You may read his medical biography and CV by clicking here. SOA offers four locations (Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton), and provides same day appointments when needed. Our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

INSPIRATION JUST AHEAD — Meet Dr Kim Furman

Furman starting SOA_Walk_Furman

The fifth in our series of getting to know our SOA physicians on a personal level features Dr Kim Furman, Fellowship Trained and Board Re-Certified Orthopedic physician.  Dr Furman specializes in hip and knee joint replacements, and there’s an inspirational side of him you may not know.  Read about it here:

What inspired you to become a physician?

Great question but difficult to answer.  Since age 9 while growing up in Brooklyn, I wanted to go into medicine. Perhaps I was influenced by my next door neighbor, who was general physician, as well as my childhood pediatrician, who made house calls, when I was sick.  Surprisingly, my parents never directed me to the medical field but fully supported my decision.

Why orthopedics?

Several factors influenced my decision for Orthopedics.

As a kid, I was always working with my Dad in his basement workshop, building and repairing all sorts of stuff.  I was mechanically inclined and loved working with my hands.

For 7 years, while in college and medical school, I was an operating room technician at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center. I had the opportunity to work with all the surgical specialties.  I was fascinated by reconstructive plastic surgery and this became my initial focus.  During that time I suffered a traumatic knee injury.  A close friend of my family was an orthopedic surgeon.  He took care of my knee injury and had a significant impact on redirecting my focus to orthopedics.

While continuing work at Columbia Presbyterian, I rotated through orthopedics.  It was at that point that my decision for orthopedics was solidified.  I loved all the neat tools that were used.  Working on fixing fractures was just like woodworking I did as a kid and continue to do now.

Unfortunately, I suffered numerous complications from my knee injury and seven surgical procedures later resulted in significant knee arthritis.  My personal experience with my injury, multiple surgeries, and arthritis has given me an inside view of the problems of my patients.  I can empathize easily with them.

What do you love most about your job?       SOAStudio-170

The gratification I get from returning a patient to a pain free life style.

What is your biggest challenge?

The ever changing medical environment (insurance, government intrusion) that has taken away the true art of medicine and has made it a business.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be an ________________.

Anthropologist/archaeologist

Your proudest moment? 

The birth of my 2 children.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled?  Why?

China, because of the incredible history and culture developments.

Any hobbies?  Activities?

Woodworking, gardening, fishing and traveling.   I was an avid softball, tennis, and paddleball player before my knee arthritis limited those activities.

What’s your next adventure?

A trip to the Antarctic.

Your guilty pleasure food?

Pepperoni pizza

NOTE:  Dr Kim Furman is  a Fellowship Trained and Board Re-Certified Orthopedic Surgeon. He specializes in the treatment of arthritic knees and hips and has been with Sarasota Orthopedic Associates for 30 years. You may read his medical CV by clicking HERE.  SOA treats both adults and children in four locations (Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton) and offers same day appointments when needed. For more about SOA, click HERE, or call 941-951-2663 for an appointment.