Tag Archives: balance disorder

TUESDAY TRIVIA ORTHOPEDIC POP QUIZ – How Much Do You Know?

SKELETON THINKING

Let’s have some fun today and see if you can answer these questions.  Answers below…no peeking!

  1. Does cracking your knuckles increase your risk of arthritis?
  2. Should you put ice or heat on an injury?
  3. What’s the #1 condition experienced by seniors?
  4. How many years of education does it take to become a fellowship trained orthopedic surgeon?
  5. What’s the reason for most visits to the emergency room?

answers

  1. While the sound of cracking knuckles can be particularly annoying to some people, truth is, contrary to popular myth, that it does not increase your chances of developing arthritis. It does, however, increase chances of minimizing your grip strength over time. The popping sound you hear is merely nitrogen releasing from the liquid in your joints. That liquid helps to lubricate your joints and keep them moving. If you experience pain with the popping, see an orthopedic hand specialist.
  2. Trick question! The answer is both. Using ice at the beginning of an injury will assist in reducing swelling. After swelling subsides, heat will help to increase blood flow to the injury and may reduce discomfort. When pain is not alleviated, consult your physician.
  3. The most common complaint among the elderly is arthritis and over 50% of seniors experience discomfort from this chronic condition. Unfortunately, arthritis is part of the aging process, however, there are many simple remedies such as NSAIDS and exercise to alleviate the associated discomfort. There are more options for more aggressive pain. As with any condition causing pain, a visit to your physician is warranted.
  4. It typically takes 14 years of education to become a fellowship trained orthopedic surgeon. The requirements are 4 years of an undergraduate degree, 4 in medicine, 5 in a residency program, and 1 in fellowship. That’s a lot of education and it ensures you’re in good hands!
  5. Most emergency room visits are from falls and injuries. Sports injuries are common among youth sports participants, weekend warriors, professional athletes, and even “DYI” homeowners. Falls are particularly common among the elderly population and may occur from balance disorders, slip & falls, medication, obesity, walkway hazards, or poor footwear.

How did you do with your answers? Any surprises?

If you have a chronic pain or injury, you’ll be pleased to know Sarasota Orthopedic Associates offer same day/next day appointments at all three of our locations when needed. Check out our website at www.SOA.md or call us at 941-951-2663.

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OFF BALANCE? IT’S MORE SERIOUS THAN YOU THINK

balance high wire

Studies have shown that 40% of us will have a balance issue at some point in our lives. Some of these issues will be the catalyst for us to see our physician. A balance disorder is a condition making one feel unsteady or dizzy. Any number of things may cause a balance disorder including:

  • Ear infection
  • Head injury
  • Medication
  • Low blood pressure
  • Eye/Vision problems
  • Arthritis
  • Inner ear condition
  • Brain disorder
  • Weak muscles or bones
  • Aging

Proper balance is important to daily living.  A good sense of balance helps us bend over without falling, rise from a chair without tumbling, turn without tipping over, and walk without stumbling. Balance is critical to maintain our independence and enjoy our daily life. Good balance functions as a result of many systems in our body working in harmony. The eyes, ears (vestibular system), and sense of surroundings, when working properly together, help us to stay upright. These tell the brain how to work with our musculoskeletal system and maintain balance.

The CDC (Center for Disease Control) says one-third of adults over 65 fall each year and among those even older, falls are the leading cause of injury related deaths. As we age, our sense of balance can deteriorate, however, there are some simple things we can do to slow the process.

balance with chair

  • Keep moving. One of our physicians’ favorite phrase is “motion is lotion”. Exercise is, indeed, our best defense against many conditions.
  • Build balance. Try standing on one leg for 30 seconds, increasing your time each day. Stay close to a counter or table for support.
  • Biking helps bone density and strengthens your muscles to help avoid falls.
  • Proper stretching of your calves will build strength and stability in legs and feet.
  • If you’re able, plank exercises help build your core.

With any exercise program or even increasing your daily activity, it’s advisable to consult your physician first and discuss any limitations you might have. At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates, we take care of your bones, joints, tendons, and muscles. Click HERE to learn more about us.