Tag Archives: arthritis

TUESDAY TRIVIA ORTHOPEDIC POP QUIZ – How Much Do You Know?

SKELETON THINKING

Let’s have some fun today and see if you can answer these questions.  Answers below…no peeking!

  1. Does cracking your knuckles increase your risk of arthritis?
  2. Should you put ice or heat on an injury?
  3. What’s the #1 condition experienced by seniors?
  4. How many years of education does it take to become a fellowship trained orthopedic surgeon?
  5. What’s the reason for most visits to the emergency room?

answers

  1. While the sound of cracking knuckles can be particularly annoying to some people, truth is, contrary to popular myth, that it does not increase your chances of developing arthritis. It does, however, increase chances of minimizing your grip strength over time. The popping sound you hear is merely nitrogen releasing from the liquid in your joints. That liquid helps to lubricate your joints and keep them moving. If you experience pain with the popping, see an orthopedic hand specialist.
  2. Trick question! The answer is both. Using ice at the beginning of an injury will assist in reducing swelling. After swelling subsides, heat will help to increase blood flow to the injury and may reduce discomfort. When pain is not alleviated, consult your physician.
  3. The most common complaint among the elderly is arthritis and over 50% of seniors experience discomfort from this chronic condition. Unfortunately, arthritis is part of the aging process, however, there are many simple remedies such as NSAIDS and exercise to alleviate the associated discomfort. There are more options for more aggressive pain. As with any condition causing pain, a visit to your physician is warranted.
  4. It typically takes 14 years of education to become a fellowship trained orthopedic surgeon. The requirements are 4 years of an undergraduate degree, 4 in medicine, 5 in a residency program, and 1 in fellowship. That’s a lot of education and it ensures you’re in good hands!
  5. Most emergency room visits are from falls and injuries. Sports injuries are common among youth sports participants, weekend warriors, professional athletes, and even “DYI” homeowners. Falls are particularly common among the elderly population and may occur from balance disorders, slip & falls, medication, obesity, walkway hazards, or poor footwear.

How did you do with your answers? Any surprises?

If you have a chronic pain or injury, you’ll be pleased to know Sarasota Orthopedic Associates offer same day/next day appointments at all three of our locations when needed. Check out our website at www.SOA.md or call us at 941-951-2663.

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THE SUPER SEVEN

superfoods

Our previous blog post talked about foods and drinks to NOT put into your body. Now let’s talk about the 7 foods that are nutritious AND taste good to help preserve your musculoskeletal system.

  1. Salmon is often referred to as a “super food”, packing a punch of protein, minerals, and vitamins like B12. Most important: salmon is rich in omega-3 fatty acids.
  2. Greek yogurt is thicker than regular yogurt because the liquid is drained giving it a creamy texture. It contains probiotic cultures and is lower in lactose than regular yogurt. Greek yogurt is an excellent source of calcium, zinc, and B12. Stir some blueberries or strawberries into a cup of plain Greek yogurt and you have a great kick start to your day.
  3. Sweet potatoes are another “super food” and extremely versatile. Plain or fancy with stuffing or toppings, they are high in fiber and potassium. They are also known to maintain a healthy blood pressure. A sweet potato contains more nutrients and less calories than a white potato.
  4. While dairy products are essential to a child’s growth, it can be a source of discomfort for some adults. Dairy products are rich in calcium and vitamin D, along with other nutrients, to help keep bones and teeth strong. For those on a diet, you may opt for a fat free version and there are lactose free brands for those with a low tolerance. Both still have the calcium that is provided in regular milk.
  5. When your mom told you to eat your veggies, she was on to something. Leafy greens should be your “go-to” vegetable whenever possible. Greens like broccoli, kale, cabbage, spinach, romaine lettuce, and arugula contain essential vitamins like A (for the immune system), C (for tissue repair), and K (for blood coagulation). Nuts may also lower your blood sugar. The best nuts for your health are almonds, pistachios, walnuts, and cashews, however, go easy since a large handful may contain as many as 200 calories.
  6. Another great source of fiber and vitamin B can be found in beans. They may also help lower cholesterol and blood sugar. The best beans with benefits are chickpeas, lentils, peas, kidney and black beans.
  7. Figs, dried or fresh, are rich in fiber and give you a feeling of fullness. They are also high in calcium to help promote bone health.

So there you have it. Add these “Super 7” to your regular diet and you’re on your way to a healthy eating habit. When you do have pain or injury to your musculoskeletal system, Sarasota Orthopedic Associates can be your “go-to” place for help. We have 3 convenient locations and offer same or next day appointments when needed.

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FIVE BAD TO THE BONE FOOD/DRINK HABITS

We often talk about how important exercise is to keep your joints lubricated.  At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates our favorite mottos are “move it or lose it” and “motion is lotion”. But what about our bones and musculoskeletal system? What we feed our bodies affects our overall health including our bones. Let’s take a look at some  foods that may be harmful when used in excess.

sugar

    1. Sugar. Yep, sugar is bad for you. You’ve heard it hundreds of times and unfortunately, that sweet stuff that tastes so good can do serious harm. First, there are calories, and heaps of them. There are good sugars in fruits and veggies, however, adding sugar in any form (including the healthy-sounding agave) is a problem. That problem worsens if you have diabetes. Sugar may also affect your heart and dental health. If you have arthritis, sugar may exacerbate symptoms. Some studies show sugar may cause addiction and cravings compared to cocaine addiction.
    2. Next is salt. Sodium is a necessary nutrient for the body in maintaining muscles, nerves, and balancing body fluids. When used in excess salt becomes a time bomb. High salt intake has been associated with increased risk of stroke, heart disease, hypertension, swelling of feet, and overall bloating.
    3. Our next culprit is soda. The average consumption per person in America is 38 gallons per year. Yes, you read that correctly. The good news is the statistic is down 6 gallons/year from a decade ago so we are starting to be more health conscious. Soda, or “pop”, contains high fructose, a form of sugar, and increases your sweet cravings. Soda also contains phosphoric acid which weakens bones and teeth. Even diet soda is harmful as it contains acids, food coloring and for some sodas, caramel coloring, a carcinogen. A diet soda may still trick the brain and induce cravings similar to one containing real sugar.
    4. Caffeine is a tough habit to break. Ninety percent of Americans consume it in some form at a rate of 300 mgs a day. That would be about three 8 oz. cups of coffee. Caffeine contains addictive qualities resulting in it being named by some as America’s favorite “drug”. It’s even more popular in European countries.
    5.  Last on the list, and you may have already guessed this one, is alcohol. While drinking small amounts of red wine have been linked with healthy benefits, there is an enormous downside to overindulgence, abuse, and addiction. Side effects may put you at risk for some cancers like liver and mouth. It may also cause poor judgement, hostility, depression, obesity, and lowered brain function.

That’s the bad news but don’t despair. On our next blog we’ll deliver the good news on how to keep your bones and muscles healthy with nourishing, tasty foods … stay tuned!

Sarasota Orthopedic Associates offers same/next day appointments at three locations. Our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

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UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL

Mandel-064Crop

Our newest physician, Dr Adam Mandel, is an Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Surgeon at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates. He took some time to sit with us and answer a few questions to get to know him on a more personal level. Take a look at our conversation:

What inspired you to become a physician?

I always was inspired to help people and strive to achieve health. Physicians help to not only cure disease but also to prevent it.  I enjoy educating people as well as continually educating myself.  Being a physician in an ever-changing world allows that.

Why orthopedics?

I was always mechanically inclined. In medicine there are procedural jobs such as orthopedics.  Being an athlete and mechanically inclined just matched me perfectly with orthopedics.

What do you love most about your job?

I enjoy the variety of cases that I do within my subspecialty. This includes trauma, sports cases, cartilage repair, tendon repairs, reconstructions, joint replacements.  I also enjoy constantly meeting new people and learning of their lives and help to ease and cure their pain or problems.  It gives me great personal satisfaction to be very gifted at what I do.

 What is your biggest challenge?

Electronic medical records, constant changing in laws, regulations, and compliance issues always challenge me. Being a physician isn’t always as glorious as it seems to be played out on television.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician what would you be?

I’d be a bartender on a beach.

Your proudest moment?

Becoming a father to two amazing children.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled? Why?

Most interesting was to Italy. The people, culture, different way of life.  It was all amazing to me.  I kept thinking of nature versus nurture and what a different life I would have if I was born there instead of the United States.

Any hobbies? Activities?

Working out, running, paddle boarding, boating, wood-working.

What’s your next adventure?

Traveling. Definitely traveling.

Your guilty pleasure food?

I’m not a sweets kind of guy or dessert, but I love sushi.

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Dr Adam Mandel is a Fellowship Trained and Board Certified Foot and Ankle Physician. He sees patients in our Lakewood Ranch and Sarasota offices. We are able to offer same day / next day appointments at any of our three locations and appointments may be may online at www.SOA.md or by calling 941-951-2663.

 

THE DOCTOR IS IN: Separating Facts from Fiction of Knee Replacement

Knee-Pain

Knee replacements have come a long way over the years, and along with improvements are misconceptions. Modern medicine is now able to reduce your post-surgical “down time” and in many cases, avoid surgery altogether. Let’s take a look at some of those myths.

Myth: You have to have knee surgery.

Truth: No one should tell you that you have to have surgery. YOU, the patient, determine when the time is right. Your orthopedic surgeon can show you the progression of your condition and discuss your discomfort level, however you are the one who makes the final decision.  Many times knee discomfort may be managed conservatively with options such as NSAIDS, physical therapy, strengthening, injections, or PRP (platelet rich plasma).

Myth: Advertising shows people running and jumping after knee surgery.

Truth: Don’t fall prey to marketing.  Everyone is unique and outcomes are different based on your individual situation.  Returning to golf and tennis are reasonable expectations after knee replacement for many patients.  Dropping 10 pounds prior to surgery and following your physical therapy instructions will make a difference in recovery.

Myth: My knee should feel like it did when I was 17.

Truth: All surgeries require a period of adjustment in recovery. If you’re 60 years old, expecting your knee to behave as it did when you were a teen is not realistic. Since everyone is different, your recovery will depend on you. Most patients are happy how their knee feels after replacement and would recommend replacement.

Myth: I heard a lecture that knee replacements don’t work and I should have regenerative therapy instead.

Truth: According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, over 90% of people having a knee replacement experienced reduced pain and are able to return to their normal activities they previously gave up. While PRP and Stem Cell Therapies are options, they aren’t the “golden ticket” you may hear in lectures peddling the fountain of youth. These may be helpful for some, but they do not “cure” arthritis and are not presently covered under insurance. Remember, everyone is different and what works for some, won’t work for others.

Bottom line: Know your orthopedic surgeon and ask questions. Based on my condition, how much improvement should I expect? What are the risks/complications? When can I go back to work? May I drive? The more you know, the lower your anxiety level and the better your ability to make decisions. ###

Steven Page, MD is a Fellowship Trained / Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon with a specialty in Sports Medicine. He specializes in surgical and non-surgical treatment of knees and shoulders. Sarasota Orthopedic Associates offers same day/next day appointments in all three locations. Visit www.SOA.md or call 941-951-2663 for more information.

Meet Ashot Kotcharian, MD: Interventional Pain Management Physician

Kotcharian lab crop

This is a continuing series of interviews we do with our physicians here at SOA. Dr Ashot Kotcharian is a Board Certified/Fellowship Trained Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Physician with a specialty in Interventional Spine and Sports Medicine. Dr Kotcharian has a strong background in interventional therapies for spine disease, complex pain syndromes, peripheral joint disease, and sports injuries. He served a most distinguished career in medicine as Assistant Professor of PM&R at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Learn more about what motivates him and how he spends his time when not at work.

What inspired you to become a physician? What inspired me to become a physician is the legacy of my great grandfather. He was my namesake. Although I have no memory of him I grew up hearing so much about him. Before me he was the only physician in our family history. I grew up listening to stories of his work and all the good he did treating those who were ill.  I knew early on that just like my namesake I too wanted to have a career that can result in good to others and help those who are ill. One of my younger sisters was born with epilepsy and has a learning disability. As a young boy I witnessed how much my parents cared for her. From city to city, hospital-to-hospital, my parents searched for the best medical treatment available. Seeing her go from one hospital to another, I wondered why nobody could help her become better. I watched my parent’s worried faces and how hard they tried to get answers and care for my sister. Once they were able to get her the care she needed and the doctors were able to get her seizures under better control the relief and joy it brought was immeasurable. This is what I wanted to do with my life.  I wanted to be able to take away peoples pain, fear and confusion and give them hope and relief.

Why orthopedics? While on my journey through medical school and residency training what I found myself enjoying the most was anatomy and musculoskeletal medicine. I learned how crucial good understanding and knowledge of anatomy can be in diagnosing nerve injuries, ligament tears, or radiculopathies. I developed a greater interest in diagnosing and treating patients who presented with muscle and tendon injuries, repetitive stress injuries, as well as back and radicular pain to name a few.

What do you love most about your job? I love how in this field the convergence of good anatomical knowledge, physical exam skill, and history taking can often lead to diagnosis without a need for invasive tests.  I get a satisfaction out of being able to arrive at the solution simply from what the patient told me and what I find on my physical exam. I get a satisfaction from knowing that I was able to treat disabling pain be it from back, muscle or tendon injury, without the need of invasive surgery.

What is your biggest challenge? Helping my patients through difficult diagnoses where treatment options are few and without a “cure” can definitely be challenging.  I would also say that being able to convey the importance of daily exercise, stretching, as well as proper posture is another big one.  While I have a lot of skills and tools with which to help stop pain, its what the patient is able to do on their own at home and in their daily life that can really keep the pain from coming back. If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be either a martial art instructor or a university professor. Although, to be honest, this is a difficult question, because I can’t see myself doing anything else. I truly love what I do and I am very passionate about it.

Your proudest moment? My proudest moment is completing my fellowship training.  As I looked back at my journey through medical school, residency, and fellowship I knew I was becoming the person I wanted to be and the person I wanted my sister and great-grandfather to be proud of.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled?  Why? It would have to be Rome.  The layers and layers of ancient history, the architecture, the people, and the food were truly amazing.

Any hobbies?  Activities? One of my biggest passions outside of medicine is martial arts, exercise, and mindfulness meditation. I have been a student of martial art since I was just a kid. Most of my studying and training has been in Taekwondo and I have earned a rank of 2nd degree black belt. I have also studied some techniques of hapkido, karate, kungfu, and Brazilian jujutsu while attending a mixed martial arts school. What I love most about martial arts is the respect, the discipline, the mindfulness, and the physical exercise.

What’s your next adventure? I don’t really know. I am pretty happy exploring the Gulf Coast for now.

Your guilty pleasure food? Oh gosh, too many probably.  Hamburgers, Chinese food, fried chicken, pizza, oh now you’re making me hungry!

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Sarasota Orthopedic Associates has three locations and offers same day/next day appointments when needed.  For more information on Dr Kotcharian or any of our physicians click here.

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Meet Steven Page, MD – Sports Medicine Physician

Throughout last year we profiled all our physicians here at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates in a series of interviews. We were pleased to have Steven Page, MD join our SOA group late last year as  Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Physician.  This week, we posed those same questions to him so you might get to know him better.

Page lab half (2)

Dr Page, what inspired you to become a physician?

When I was in high school, I injured my ankle playing soccer. I went to see an orthopedic sports medicine doctor. He took great care of me and led me through a rehabilitation program that got me back to playing quickly so I didn’t have to miss the season.   I loved playing and being around sports.  I knew then I wanted to be a sports medicine doctor so I could take of people the way he took care of me.

Why orthopedics?

I really like that we can actually fix problems and get people back to doing the things they like to do.

What do you love most about your job?

I love that my patients are really motivated to get back to what they enjoy. When patients are engaged in their own care, we work together like a team to accomplish their goals.

What is your biggest challenge?

Finding a way to spend as much a time as I can with every patient while not making the next patient I see have to wait.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a __________________.

A veterinarian. I have two boxers and I absolutely love animals.

Your proudest moment?

A college football player that I did a knee surgery on during my fellowship is still playing in the NFL over 10 years later today. I am proud that I had a small part in enabling his success.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled? Why?

My favorite place visited is Maui, Hawaii. You can be on top of a volcano that looks like a Martian landscape in the morning and scuba diving with sea turtles in the afternoon.

Any hobbies? Activities?

I love to play sports and enjoy skiing and scuba diving. I get injured a little easier now as I get older so it helps me relate to my patients.

What’s your next adventure?

Becoming a father. I trained for years to be a surgeon, but I am totally unprepared for this.

Your guilty pleasure food?

French fries and macaroni and cheese. And I don’t feel guilty about it all!

Tablet with the text Sports medicine on the display

Whether you are a weekend warrior, professional athlete, or just a regular couch potato who overused those muscles and bones,  Dr Page sees patients of all  walks of life and all ages from pediatric to geriatric. If you’d like an evaluation, call 941-951-2663 or schedule an appointment with us online through our web page at www.SOA.md.   We have three locations and offer same day appointments. To keep up to date on everything at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates “like” us on Facebook HERE, or, follow us on Twitter HERE.

THUMBS UP ON EASING YOUR THUMB PAIN

hand xray

At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates we are often asked, “My thumb hurts, is this part of aging? Must I live with it or can something be done?” The good news is a resounding YES THERE IS HELP and treatment is typically non-invasive.

Thumb pain is common among females over the age of 50. It can occur as a result of several factors: family history, repetitive pinching, twisting and turning activities, and history of trauma to the thumb. One of the most common joints in the hand to develop osteoarthritis is the thumb. In osteoarthritis there is gradual reduction of joint space. As we continue use of our hands, small muscles around the basal joint of the thumb work hard to compensate for instability. Ligaments also tend to show changes. The wear and tear of the joint exacerbates pain intensity resulting in patients modifying the way they pinch and/or delegating activities or worse, simply giving up on activities they enjoy.

Symptoms of thumb arthritis can be pain with pinching or gripping activities. Usually patients experience pain while turning keys/door knobs, writing or typing, and opening jars or lids. Pain might also occur during rest.

Treatment for thumb arthritis can be operative or non-operative. Non-operative measures could include cortisone injection for pain reduction or a consultation with a hand therapist.

At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates, hand therapy consultation includes comprehensive evaluation to understand the activities that cause pain. It also includes measuring the range of motion and strength in both hands. Your hand therapist might fabricate a customized brace to rest the affected joints. Patient education is the most important part of treatment. Our hand therapists will educate you on various pain management strategies, activity modification, or a customized brace to immobilize the wear and tear on the joints. If range of motion is affected we can teach stretching and dynamic stabilization exercises to strengthen the small muscles of hand. Additionally, there are joint protection techniques to reduce stress in the affected joints.

Success of conservative management depends on several factors such as intensity of the arthritis and patient compliance in following through with the therapist recommendations.

Don’t give up on your thumb discomfort. Sarasota Orthopedic Associates has Certified Hand Therapists in all of our three locations.  Check out our website at www.SOA.md where you may make an appointment online or call 941-951-2663. We offer same day appointments when necessary.

hand3hand zebra

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What do YOUR hands say?

hand- talking

Our hands are an intricate marvel of the human body. With 27 bones in each hand and wrist it’s no surprise so much can go wrong for so many people.

We often think of injuries to athletes or common clumsy mishaps when a hand is injured. It’s not just athletes who come to us for problems with their hands and wrists. Every day, people of all backgrounds share challenges of pain in the hand or wrist. Think about the different occupations that might develop some form of hand/wrist pain and how it could affect their lives:

  • String musicians
  • Administrative workers using laptops
  • Cashiers using a laser scanner at check-out
  • Custodians
  • Homemakers
  • Gardeners/Landscapers
  • Mechanics & assembly workers
  • Accountants
  • Butchers
  • Food preppers

In reality, we are all at risk for hand or wrist issues at some point in our lives. One of the more common complaints we see at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates is carpal tunnel syndrome. This is a result of overuse and presents with a tingly feeling or numbness, typically a result of pressure on a nerve in the wrist. Tendinitis will appear with a weakness, discomfort, and/or limited movement. DeQuervain’s has the tendons swollen on the thumb side of the wrist. Trigger Finger presents on a finger that is difficult to bend or straighten and you may see a bump on the palm near the affected finger. You may have heard the condition Dupuytren’s, which a fibrous thickening of tissue causing a finger (or fingers) to curl up. Let’s not forget cysts and arthritis.  Oh my … so many things to go wrong!

hand-trigger   hand-arthritis         hand-cyst

Not all hand conditions require treatment, particularly if there is no associated pain or impairment to your daily activity. It’s always a good idea to be safe and see a physician if you have a specific concern. Ultimately, when you do need treatment, not to worry, we have you covered. Gregory Farino, MD is our hand and wrist physician treating hand/wrist disorders in conjunction with our Certified Hand Therapists at each of our three locations. Our commitment at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life!

What’s That Sound? SNAP, CRACKLE, POP

knuckle cracking

It’s a question most orthopedic surgeons get asked on a daily basis: “My joint pops…is that normal?” Like most things in life, if it’s not broke (or hurting), don’t fix it. An acute injury resulting in an audible “pop” is different from a situation such as a hip “popping” for years. Popping, cracking, or crunching of joints is quite common and often nothing to be too concerned with, especially if it is not causing discomfort or affecting one’s activities. Here are some need to know tidbits on joint popping and cracking.

What Causes This?

  • Numerous theories and causes exist including ligament stretching, tendons snapping, nerves subluxing, or bubbles forming within the joint. A recent study investigated the bubble theory using MRI videos to propose the mechanism by which “cracking” your knuckles results in a negative-pressure event which draws synovial fluid into the joint, thus leading to the subsequent pop. Why does it feel good to crack a knuckle? Thoughts are that the pressure phenomenon within/around the joints stimulates certain receptors which allows for muscles to relax. Another theory suggests natural painkillers (endorphins) are released with such activity, which may explain why it can be a difficult habit to break.
  • Other things must also be taken into account when discussing the cause of noise around a joint, such as prior injuries, surgeries, hardware/implants around the joint, and other accompanying symptoms. It is quite common for someone who injures their ACL to feel or hear a “pop” from the ligament rupturing. This must be taken in a different context from the chronic, painless popping that someone may experience around their knee cap from soft-tissue issues.
  • Lastly, arthritis can commonly be accompanied with crunching or cracking sensations and as long as it is not resulting in increasing pain or swelling, it is something that can be observed. Some older style knee/hip implants may result in noises (e.g. squeaking), and if you were experiencing this, it would likely be best to visit with your orthopedic surgeon to check the status of things and make sure the components were not wearing out in an abnormal fashion.

Should I Be Concerned?

In general, if the popping/cracking around a joint is not causing pain or swelling to occur or interfering with your function or activities, there shouldn’t be much concern. Studies have looked at whether or not cracking your knuckles would lead to arthritis, and to date, no such correlation has been shown. That said, it is generally recommended that one not perform such activities too frequently or on purpose as there have been reports of joints/knuckles becoming loose from habitual cracking. In addition, habitual knuckle crackers have been shown to develop hand swelling (not from arthritis) and decreased grip strength which can lead to decreased manual function. Nodules can also form from such activity, and this may cause cosmetic concerns for certain patients.

Common Areas to Experience It

Any joint can develop it, but perhaps the most common areas to experience it are in the hands, knees, spine, and shoulders.

  • As already mentioned, knuckle cracking is a common occurrence.
  • With regards to the knee, the anterior aspect often experiences popping/crunching from the patellofemoral joint (knee cap). This can be from mild softening of the joint, but most of the time it is from soft-tissues in the area (e.g. plica, fat pad) that simply release themselves during motion.
  • Similar to the knuckles in the hand, the facet joints and other muscles/ligaments around the spine are prone to popping.
  • The spine is a complex unit with numerous muscles, joints, discs, and ligaments contributing to its stability. Chiropractors make a living out of therapeutically popping, cracking, and aligning patients’ backs, so why would you get too concerned with your back popping if you’re not having any discomfort with it?
  • Lastly, the AC joint of the shoulder almost always develops arthritis, but rarely causes too much pain or functional limitation. Popping over this portion of the shoulder with no other symptoms is quite common. On the contrary, patients with symptomatic instability or arthritis in the shoulder joint proper will almost always have pain or issues with their function accompanying this, and would thus be treated differently to the above mentioned scenarios.

Summary

Painless popping around joints is an issue that one should hardly ever get too concerned with. If popping occurred from an acute injury or there were other symptoms being experienced in addition to it, then a visit with your orthopedic surgeon would be recommended at that point. Otherwise, keep up what you are doing and don’t let some painless noise around a joint stress you out.

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Trevor Born, MD is an orthopedic surgeon with a specialty in sports medicine. At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life. We have four convenient locations and offer same day appointments when needed. Visit our website at www.SOA.md or call us at 941-951-2663 for an appointment. Appointments may also be made via our website.