COMING TO AN ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON NEAR YOU?

3D-printed-splint-spotlight-b-1024x650    3d printed fingers 3d printed spine

Bionic Hands? – A young Haitian boy born without fingers gets a 3D printed left hand and is now playing catch with his friends.

A New Backbone? – Peking physicians print the first 3D vertebra into a bone cancer patient, allowing new bone to grow into the replaced portion of his spine.

Skull replacements? – In 2014, Dutch surgeons replace the skull of a 22 year old female with a plastic dome for a rare headache disorder.

Science fiction?  Not at all.  People have been using 3D printing to replace simple devices and have now expanded into the field of medicine.  Studies show that this year alone, the orthopedic implant industry is projected to grow over 7% in the United States and this demand will only continue to increase as technology improves. The ability to cost efficiently replace damaged body parts may some day improve people’s lives. Just last week a California seven-year-old received a prosthetic limb via 3D printing. Read about it HERE.

What are your thoughts about 3D Printing?  We’d love to hear from you in our comment section below.

 

 

WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

orthopedic tree     SOA logo for email

We are often asked about the significance of the tree in our logo.  Truth is, we are paying homage to the medical field of orthopedics. The crooked tree symbol was first used as an illustration by Nicholas Andry in his 1741 published book on orthopedic medicine. Since that time, it has become the symbol of our profession.

The word “orthopedic” stems from the Greek roots, “ortho” (meaning straight or free from deformity) and “Pais” (meaning child). Early orthopedists would brace or splint young children so they would grow upward, strong, and straight.

Many people think of orthopedic physicians as  primarily treating broken bones.  We are so much more than that!  We deal with the prevention or correction of injuries not only to the skeletal system,  but the associated muscles, joints, and ligaments as well.  We’ve come a long way in technology and knowledge from when Nicholas Andry first drew that bent sapling which has stood the test of time.

Now you know!

 

 

 

HELP: I HAVE BACK PAIN- Should I Still Exercise?

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Sadly, 90% of the American population will experience some form of significant back pain at some point in their life.  While one can get much advice from the internet, magazines, healthcare providers, and even their Aunt Edna on what is the best remedy, it is often unclear whether continuing an exercise program is a good idea following the development of acute back pain.

A good rule of thumb is that for the first day or two one should try to move as tolerated, given their level of the pain.  Studies have shown that the patient who stays in bed not doing any activity will do worse in terms of returning to regular activities as opposed to those who move as best as they can and continue to try to function.

After the first few days one can start to reintroduce activities as tolerated. If, however, any pain radiates down the legs with exercise, then that should be avoided.  Oftentimes, if symptoms are recurring in the leg, they may be more notable when a person is standing or sitting.  In the case where pain radiates down the leg while in a seated position, biking would be an exercise to be avoided while walking or swimming would be a recommended activity.  The same holds true if pain is worse with standing; in that case, biking may be the recommended activity.

In general, it is safe to exercise as long as the pain in the back remains localized and does not become worse with a particular activity.  As with any condition, if these measures along with over-the-counter medication do not help over a period of a week or two, medical care should be sought. At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates, we are well equipped to handle any type of injury, including back pain, and are committed to getting you back to life.

Paul Lento, MD

PM&R, American Medical Society Sports Medicine

 

 

ORTHOPEDIC CARE: Not Just for Athletes Anymore

violin   pointe_584  Painter-Jen-Brandon_Lanscape-Artist_Custom-Portrait-Painter_Painting-teacher_Summer-PAinting-Workshop

When we think of someone needing to see an orthopedic physician, we most often visualize a high school football player, a weekend warrior, or anyone experiencing an injury or trauma.

Reality is performance artists, just like athletes, often develop conditions in need of orthopedic care. Consider the cellist who suffers from carpal tunnel syndrome brought on by repetitive hand/wrist motion; the tuba player in a marching band with a painful back from the weight of the instrument; the ballet dancer with foot and ankle injuries from constant pressure on their feet; the portrait artist with shoulder complaints from prolonged lifting of one arm for hours at a time. All of these artists, whether practicing or performing, overwork some joints while underutilizing other protective muscle groups. These imbalances, if not identified and treated appropriately, can ultimately lead to pain and loss of function.

Therefore, If you are a musician, dancer, or artist, whether by profession or for personal enjoyment and you suffer from soreness or pain, consider appropriate orthopedic care. Many times an appropriate treatment program that encompasses physical therapy and other non-surgical treatments can get the performing artist on the road to recovery. Here at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates, we have 10 physicians in 3 locations offering same day appointments with on-site physical therapists that provide comprehensive care. Feel free to reach us 941 951 2663 (BONE)

 

TENNIS ELBOW? It’s Not What You Think!

tennis-elbow Many people will come to the sports clinic with complaints of pain on either side of their elbow which has been present for months and is aggravated by gripping things or shaking hands. While often referred to as Golfer’s or Tennis elbow, this painful tendon condition usually occurs not from playing golf or tennis but from repeatedly gripping or lifting objects improperly. Unfortunately, the condition can become severe enough where the tendons on either side of the elbow will become swollen, degenerated, and possibly torn causing persistent pain. Despite being referred to as lateral or medial epicondylitis by the medical community, this condition is known not to be an inflammatory condition. Because of this, typical anti-inflammatory medications like Ibuprofen or Naprosyn often will not help. While steroid or “cortisone” injections can be tried and may give temporary relief, studies have shown that the condition often returns weeks to months later causing further delay in healing. The good news is that this condition can be treated non-surgically. Medical studies have revealed that a dedicated specific exercise program that concentrates on eccentric strengthening of the elbow and wrist tendons often will successfully cure the problem. Even when rehabilitation fails, other procedures less invasive than having surgery can often be performed which can significantly improve pain in 90% of the cases. So whether you are struggling with chronic elbow pain from playing doubles tennis or from lifting luggage at the airport, the physicians at SOA can evaluate your elbow problem, correctly diagnose the cause of the pain, and suggest a specific treatment regimen which will get you back on the road to recovery. Paul Lento, MD PM&R, American Medical Society Sports Medicine