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COMMON HARMFUL MYTHS ABOUT PHYSICAL THERAPY

pt-month

October is NATIONAL PHYSICAL THERAPY MONTH so what better time to honor our awesome physical therapy staff for their skills and dedication to help our patients get back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life. Physical Therapy is often times misconstrued as a regimen of pain, or only for injuries, or even “why bother, I can do it myself”.   So let’s take a look at dispelling some common misconceptions.

First of all, Physical Therapy may be prescribed for a number of reasons: post-surgical rehabilitation, sports injury rehabilitation, joint replacement therapy, or to relieve the discomfort of a long term health condition such as arthritis. Rehabilitation of major joints and muscle groups allow you to move better and relieve pain. It even helps improve and restore physical function and fitness levels. The ultimate goal is to make daily tasks and activities easier for you to perform.

So why shouldn’t you do the therapy on your own? Bottom line, you could do more harm. A Physical Therapy regimen is certainly one to be practiced on your own as prescribed, however, that does not mean a single visit.  Typically, a physical therapist assesses your condition and creates an individualized treatment plan to help restore your physical and vocational function specific to you.  The ultimate goal is for you to return safely and efficiently to your previous level of activity.  This requires on-going monitoring by the professional guidance of a licensed Physical Therapist, and possibly increased therapy and/or additional exercises.

We’ve heard many a patient say “I thought surgery was my only option”. While that may ultimately be the case for some people, many an injury or condition has been successfully treated with physical therapy as an alternative to surgery.  For example, a rotator cuff tear or knee arthritis does not necessarily translate into a surgical procedure. Specific muscle strengthening therapies may help support the shoulder or knee and provide relief from discomfort as well as a return to normal activity. A recent patient survey showed 79% of those patients said physical therapy has helped them avoid surgery.

Another myth is that “physical therapy can be performed by any health care professional”. Physical Therapists are licensed professionals with years of education and extensive training. After an undergraduate degree, as many as three additional years of education in their respective field are required to become licensed. There are even specialties like orthopedics, geriatrics, pediatrics, oncology, sports and women’s health certifications within the field.

Sarasota Orthopedic Associates provides Physical and Occupational Therapy in our three locations of Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, and Venice. We offer same day appointments and accept most insurances.

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DIZZY? Top 10 Facts about Vestibular Disorders

dizzy2

What’s so important about a vestibular disorder and, more important, what the heck is it? First of all, it’s very important and, if you are over 40 years old, you have a 1 in 3 chance of experiencing a balance problem at some point in your lifetime. A balance disorder can be a life altering condition if untreated. The Physical Therapists at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates may help determine if you have a balance disorder. This week is Balance Awareness week so it’s a perfect time to discover if you have a vestibular disorder.

Are you:

  • Dizzy when walking?
  • Off balance when getting out of bed?
  • Have trouble walking in the dark?
  • Lose balance if you bend over?

Here are some facts from the Vestibular Disorder Association to give you a better understanding of how your balance system might be affected and when you should see a physician.

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1.The vestibular system includes parts of the inner ear and brain that process sensory information involved with balance.

2. Over 35% of US adults aged 40 years and older (69 million Americans) have had a vestibular dysfunction at some point in their lives.

3. Vestibular disorders may be caused by disease, injury, poisoning by drugs or chemicals, autoimmune causes, traumatic brain injury, or aging. Many vestibular disorders occur from unexplained causes.

4. Symptoms of vestibular disorders include dizziness, vertigo (a spinning sensation), imbalance, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), fatigue, jumping vision, nausea/vomiting, hearing loss, anxiety, and cognitive difficulties.

5. Vestibular disorders are difficult to diagnose. It is common for a patient to consult 4 or more physicians over a period of several years before receiving an accurate diagnosis.

6. There is no “cure” for most vestibular disorders. They may be treated with medication, physical therapy, lifestyle changes (e.g. diet, exercise), surgery, or positional maneuvers. In most cases, patients must adapt to a host of life-altering limitations.

7. Vestibular disorders impact patients and their families physically, mentally, and emotionally. In addition to physical symptoms such as dizziness and vertigo, vestibular patients can experience poor concentration, memory, and mental fatigue. Many vestibular patients suffer from anxiety and depression due to fear of falling and the loss of their independence.

8. Common vestibular disorders include benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), Ménière’s disease, labyrinthitis, vestibular neuritis, and vestibular migraine.

9. In the US, medical care for patients with chronic balance disorders exceeds $1 billion per year.

10. The Vestibular Disorders Association (VEDA) is the largest patient organization providing information, support, and advocacy for vestibular patients worldwide.

If you have symptoms, consult your physician for a diagnosis. And remember, our Physical Therapists can help you assess your balance and get you “back on your feet”. Sarasota Orthopedic Associates offers physical therapy in all three locations convenient to Sarasota, Manatee, and Charlotte counties. For more information, visit our website at www.SOA.md or call us at 941.951.2663. We offer same and next day appointments when needed.

Top Ten list from: Vestibular Disorders Association, Portland Oregon at www.Vestibular.org

DO GOOD TODAY, AND A LITTLE MORE TOMORROW

helping harvey

Early last week Sarasota Orthopedic Associates teamed up with The Mall at University Town Center and Doctors Hospital of Sarasota to organize a blood drive for the victims of hurricane Harvey. The storm slammed hard into Houston leaving a path of devastation. Blood banks in Houston were unable to provide donation supplies for their hospitals so we stepped up to assist with the collaboration of SunCoast Blood Bank. In total, our donation efforts were able to save 108 lives. Teamwork. Generosity. Caring for one another. It felt good to help.

This past weekend, it was our turn to ASK for help. Hurricane Irma took her time heading for Florida and we were on edge for several days awaiting word of where she would touch down.  The meaning of the name “Irma” is “war goddess” and Irma certainly approached us as if going to war with Florida! By all reports it appeared Sarasota would receive a category 5 and suddenly our neighbors to the south in the Keys and Naples were hit hard with a 4.

By the time Irma reached us, we were thankful to hear Irma dropped to a Cat 1. Keep in mind, a category 1 has 75 mph winds and is still destructive. Many residents in Sarasota, Manatee, and Charlotte counties remain without power; some don’t anticipate power for another week. Too many local businesses cannot reopen due to flood and wind damage. Imagine this: a week in Florida’s 90 degree heat and humidity without air conditioning!

The good news: Irma brought out the best in us.  Neighbors helping neighbors, offering lodging to those without hurricane shutters, shelter to those in flood zones (and the ability to bring pets!), food to those unable to cook, friends helping to clear broken branches from yards, offering rides to those unable to locate fuel for their cars (half our gas stations are still dry), linemen, firefighters and police from out of state, and so much more.  Loss of power and cell towers gave us the opportunity to make new friends during the storm!

NOW is the time to help in the aftermath. In addition to providing financial assistance your favorite local charitable organization, here are some other ways to help:

    • If you need a clean-up service, use a LOCAL business.
    • Carpool to save fuel during the shortage.
    • Offer a ride to an elderly person.
    • If you eat out, detour from the chain restaurants and eat like a local.
    • Help a neighbor clear their yard.
    • If you aren’t going to use your hurricane canned food/water supplies, donate them to a food bank.
    • Give blood, save a life.

Helping someone else feels good … one good deed goes beyond what you can imagine.

helping

SUGAR & DRUG ABUSE? Winning the War

sugar heroin

Recent studies have found that sugar can be as addictive as cocaine or alcohol according to the US National Institute on Drug Abuse. For some people, eating foods high in sugar may produce chemical changes in the brain’s “reward” center causing addictive cravings. Sugar is sugar … don’t be fooled by replacing white table sugar with honey, agave, or brown sugar. Those may have some nutritional value, but they are still sugar with calories and addictive qualities. In fact, sugar overuse may sometimes lead to problems other than addiction like diabetes and liver disease.

SUGAR IN TWO FORMS

  • Free sugars are those added to food and liquids whether at the table, in the kitchen, or at the manufacturer. Free sugar is the form we need to cut down on consumption. Identifying these sugars can be difficult since they appear in many different forms like agave, raw sugar, cane sugar, corn syrup, fructose, sucrose, molasses, glucose, dextrose, coconut sugar, and honey.
  • Natural sugars are those found in fresh, frozen, or dried fruits and vegetables. They are also found in dairy products like milk, plain yogurt, and cheese.

WHAT FREE SUGAR DOES TO OUR BODIES

Consuming excessive sugar over long periods of time stimulates our brain activity and hormone levels. This increases glucose levels which lead to the pancreas releasing insulin. This causes the body to retain calories as fat, causing weight gain. Carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, chips, and fries process slower than free sugar, however, still break down into sugar. The result: the excess weight puts strain on our joints and we crave more sugar.

Since these sugary foods stimulate the same areas of the brain as drugs of abuse, they may cause loss of control over consumption and cravings. Currently the average American consumes almost 20 teaspoons of sugar every day; that’s over 65 pounds of sugar a year, per person!

SO HOW DO WE WIN THIS WAR?

  • The World Health Organization recommends a maximum of 10% and ideally less than 5% of our calories be consumed from added or natural sugar. For the average person per day, the recommendation is 6 teaspoons for women and 9 teaspoons for men.
  • Read labels; food labels list ingredients in descending order. If sugar or a form of sugar is in the first 3 ingredients, put it back on the shelf.
  • The same goes for a packaged food with more than one sugar listed — put it back!
  • Eliminate soft drinks and fruit juices; they are jam packed with sugar.
  • Limit consumption of candy, baked goods, and desserts to special occasions.
  • “Low fat” packaged foods often compensate with extra sugar; read the label.
  • Eat fresh fruit rather than canned which have added syrup containing sugar.
  • Protein such as eggs, beans, and nuts can help control sugar cravings.
  • Eliminate sugars from your diet s-l-o-w-l-y; don’t go “cold turkey”.
  • Drink water!

The good news is that when cutting back, no math or calorie counting is involved in eliminating sugar. Try replacing sugar with tempting flavors like ginger, lemon, vanilla bean, nutmeg, or cinnamon.  Bottom line, the easiest way to cut back is to avoid processed sugar whenever possible and eat fresh fruits instead.

Taking care of our bodies through eating well and proper exercise is paramount to healthy bones and muscles. If you experience pain or discomfort in your joints or muscles, give us a call at 941-951-2663 for an appointment. At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates we have four locations and offer same day appointments when needed.

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Sources: WebMD; Authority Nutrition; American Diabetes Association; US National Institute on Drug Abuse; World Health Organization

 

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL WITH JULIE GLADDEN BARRE, MD

We are so proud to introduce you to Orthopedic Surgeon, Julie Gladden Barre, MD.  Dr. Barre has a specialty in Sports Medicine and treats all ages from high school athletes to  couch potatoes to weekend warriors to professional athletes. You may find her professional bio on our website, however, we wanted to  spend a few minutes with Dr. Barre and get to know her on a more personal level.  Read about it here:

Barre headshot color

What inspired you to become a physician?

Since I was very young I have always had compassion for those in need and this carried into my initial professional calling as a physical therapist. I loved helping people who had been through an injury or surgery and eventually when drawn into management, my love of patient care continued to lure me back to hands on treatment of those in need. I then decided to return to school and become a physician.

Why orthopedics?

With my unique background as a therapist I understood the process of those who were injured requiring surgery and the often grueling process required to get back to what brings someone joy in life. The human body and the increasing active lifestyle of people in today’s world is what has always fascinated me and propelled my love of Orthopedics.

What do you love most about your job?

I love meeting people every day and finding out about their lives and occupations. My job is so satisfying and I thoroughly enjoy being able to help get people back on their feet again as well as help them get back to their normal activities of daily living or get back on the field or golf course or tennis court.

What is your biggest challenge?

One of the hardest things to deal with in the field of medicine is when tragedy happens and seeing people go through physical and emotional pain. As a physician it is hard not to feel the pain that patients and their loved ones go through. I like to encourage my patients and establish a team approach so that I am with them every step of the process.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a_______.

I can’t imagine not being a physician, however if I had to choose something it would be a chef. Everyone loves food and I thoroughly enjoy pleasing people through creativity in the kitchen.

Your proudest / happiest moment?

I think my proudest and happiest moment is when I had my son during the 4th year of my orthopedic residency. Residency is a grueling time in life and after going through a full 9 month pregnancy during residency, the morning my son was born was one of the most joyful times in my life.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled? Why?

Guatemala. I helped a medical team during a medical mission trip in college and I was so moved by the people in Central America and how grateful they were for the medical care they received.

Any hobbies? Activities?

Beach activities with family, cooking, travel, attending sporting events, exercise.

 What’s your next adventure?

I would love to take a trip to Europe with my family someday.

Your guilty pleasure food?

A really good coffee and French pastry.

Dr Barre is aligned with the mission of Sarasota Orthopedic Associates to get her patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.  SOA has three locations and offers same day or next appointments when needed. Check the website at www.SOA.md or call 941-951-BONE (2663) for more information.

SURGEON ON A MISSION

At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates, we believe in supporting our community in many ways and we encourage our staff to do so as well. Our spine surgeon, Dr Andrew Moulton, goes a step further and shares his skills globally to help children in developing countries. Our local newspaper recently interviewed him to learn more about his mission as co-founder of the Butterfly Foundation.  Read about it here:

Moulton Surgical Team

Dr. Andrew Moulton is a nationally recognized expert in the diagnosis and treatment of spinal disorders and a surgeon at Sarasota Orthopedics Associates. He is also the founder of the Butterfly Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of children with complex spinal deformity in developing countries.

Since 2003, Dr. Moulton has performed dozens of living-saving surgeries, while promoting the advancement of spine deformity treatment technology by training local surgeons. We spoke to him recently about his philanthropic work. Visit www.SOA.md for more information.

What inspired you to start the Butterfly Foundation?

As an orthopedic resident, I visited Honduras on a pediatric mission in which many club foot surgeries were performed. The next trip, there were more patients than before. I looked at the demographics and realized that the procedures themselves were a drop in the bucket compared to the size of the problem, and then decided to focus on training local surgeons. “Teach a man to fish and he feeds his community for a lifetime” is our motto.

Where are some of the places the foundation serves?

We have ongoing efforts in the Dominican Republic, Malawi, Chile, Peru, Jamaica, Vietnam, China and Myanmar.

What kind of spinal injuries or illnesses have you treated?

We treat primarily pediatric deformities, including spinal injuries and severe, life-threatening cases of scoliosis.

Moulton pt    Moulton spine film

Where did the name “Butterfly Foundation” come from?

Because of society’s attitudes toward their deformity, we saw how these kids would come in, bundled up, socially withdrawn, embarrassed, even outcast. Once they have their surgeries and heal, they stand up straight, they run, and they jump and play. There’s such a profound joy to see them move so freely, without pain. Their transformation reminded us of how a butterfly is born and the name stuck.

What was your most memorable case?

The most memorable case may have been one of the first very extensive ones. After a 15-hour surgery, with my hands bleeding from blisters acquired over the week of surgeries, I sat in a corner waiting over an hour for the patient to wake up to ensure she was not paralyzed from the surgery. She woke up in great shape. I slept well that night!

What inspires you to continue doing this work?

Doing this work takes me back to the basics of being a doctor — to why I wanted to become one in the first place. These people don’t have many chances in life. For me to give a little means a lot to them. When the people thank you, they really mean it. You’re the only chance they have.

How can our readers become involved with your foundation?

People are welcome to email inquiries to info@SOA.md.

Moulton photo

SOURCE: Herald Tribune/Style Magazine/Sunday, August 6, 2017

Link to article: http://sarasotaheraldtribune.fl.app.newsmemory.com/publink.php?shareid=0b1b06237

Butterfly Foundation Facebook Page

Meet Steven Page, MD – Sports Medicine Physician

Throughout last year we profiled all our physicians here at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates in a series of interviews. We were pleased to have Steven Page, MD join our SOA group late last year as  Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Physician.  This week, we posed those same questions to him so you might get to know him better.

Page lab half (2)

Dr Page, what inspired you to become a physician?

When I was in high school, I injured my ankle playing soccer. I went to see an orthopedic sports medicine doctor. He took great care of me and led me through a rehabilitation program that got me back to playing quickly so I didn’t have to miss the season.   I loved playing and being around sports.  I knew then I wanted to be a sports medicine doctor so I could take of people the way he took care of me.

Why orthopedics?

I really like that we can actually fix problems and get people back to doing the things they like to do.

What do you love most about your job?

I love that my patients are really motivated to get back to what they enjoy. When patients are engaged in their own care, we work together like a team to accomplish their goals.

What is your biggest challenge?

Finding a way to spend as much a time as I can with every patient while not making the next patient I see have to wait.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a __________________.

A veterinarian. I have two boxers and I absolutely love animals.

Your proudest moment?

A college football player that I did a knee surgery on during my fellowship is still playing in the NFL over 10 years later today. I am proud that I had a small part in enabling his success.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled? Why?

My favorite place visited is Maui, Hawaii. You can be on top of a volcano that looks like a Martian landscape in the morning and scuba diving with sea turtles in the afternoon.

Any hobbies? Activities?

I love to play sports and enjoy skiing and scuba diving. I get injured a little easier now as I get older so it helps me relate to my patients.

What’s your next adventure?

Becoming a father. I trained for years to be a surgeon, but I am totally unprepared for this.

Your guilty pleasure food?

French fries and macaroni and cheese. And I don’t feel guilty about it all!

Tablet with the text Sports medicine on the display

Whether you are a weekend warrior, professional athlete, or just a regular couch potato who overused those muscles and bones,  Dr Page sees patients of all  walks of life and all ages from pediatric to geriatric. If you’d like an evaluation, call 941-951-2663 or schedule an appointment with us online through our web page at www.SOA.md.   We have three locations and offer same day appointments. To keep up to date on everything at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates “like” us on Facebook HERE, or, follow us on Twitter HERE.

HERE’S ONE FOR THE LADIES …

HIGH HEEL HAZARDS

high heels louboutin

We know, we know. We can already hear you saying, “But I love my high heels”. Aesthetically, high heels make the shape of a woman’s leg more appealing yet it seems the prettiest shoes are the most dangerous. Unfortunately, high heels are the poorest shoe choice for your health, propelling your entire body out of alignment, and altering your gait. What’s a girl to do? We’re not suggesting you become a fashion “don’t”, however there are some things you should ponder before buying your next pair of high heels.

First, some facts:

  • Every day in the US, there are over 28,000 ankle sprains.
  • 55% of those go untreated as “just a sprain”.
  • An untreated sprain may lead to future instability, early arthritis, exercise difficulty, and balance issues
  • High heels pull the muscles and joints out of sync with the rest of your body, causing back and knee pain.
  • 42% of women 25-49 years of age wear heels daily; 34% of women over 50 wear them as well.
  • In 1986, 60% of women wore heels daily; that has decreased today to below 39%. Women are now opting for more comfort and there are many well- known brands offering sophisticated choices.
  • A 1” heel puts 22% of body weight on the ball of your foot; a 2” heel places 57% of your weight; and a 3” heel puts a whopping 76% of your body weight on the forward foot. Ouch.

high heel

So, how can you be fashionable and healthy at the same time? Some tips:

  • Avoid wearing high heels on a daily basis; vary your shoe choices to rotate heel heights.
  • When wearing heels, limit wear to 4 or 5 hours at a time.
  • Limit heel height to 2”; if you need more height, choose a platform with an incline of a couple inches. A “kitten” heel (a one inch, tapered skinny heel) is a fashionable alternative.
  • Avoid pointed toe boxes that squeeze your toes together; if you want a pointed look, make sure your toes have room in the toe box before the shoe tapers (a pointy toe high heel may cause ingrown toenails).
  • Our feet tend to expand as the day progresses so purchase shoes later in the day for the best fit.
  • Perform daily calf stretches.
  • Shoes that are too large may cause blisters from friction when walking; leather insoles will help keep your foot from sliding inside the shoe.
  • Choose a thicker heel rather than a skinny stiletto for better balance.
  • Many savvy shoe brands are making dressy flats so why not opt for a pair?

If your feet or ankles have suffered the wear and tear of time in fashionable high heels, the physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates can help get you back on your feet. We have convenient locations in Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, and Venice and are able to accommodate same day appointments when needed. For more information go to our website at www.SOA.md or give us a call at 941-951-2663. Be sure to like our Facebook page here or follow us on Twitter here.

Our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

Sources: American Podiatric Medical Association; American Osteopathic Association; Medical Daily; Women’s Health

WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

flag fireworks

July 4th.  This is not simply a day of fireworks, a holiday from work, backyard cookouts, or celebration.  It is also one of reflection. What does it mean and how did we get here 241 years later from the most monumental day in our history?

In 1776, the 13 colonies legally declared themselves a new nation, proclaiming independence from the British Empire. Historians dispute the date, claiming the actual signing of the vote was July 2nd with the Declaration becoming official on the Fourth of July.  Five representatives were responsible for drafting the Declaration of Independence with Thomas Jefferson cited at the primary author.

This week we reflect on those important words we learned as children … the words that protect our freedom and independence.

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.” (For the full text of the Declaration click HERE.)

So this week, Sarasota Orthopedic Associates celebrates and remembers with you.  Let’s join together and cherish our freedom.

Declaration of Independence

YOUR FEET … Engineering or Art?

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Leonardo da Vinci was quoted as saying “The human foot is a masterpiece of engineering and a work of art”. He wasn’t kidding around considering a human foot contains 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 100 muscles, tendons, and ligaments.

Because the foot is so intricate, there are so many things that can go awry; a break or fracture in any area can have an effect in another area of the body. In every case, an injury as serious as a fracture will mean the inability to bear any weight. This can be quite painful, offset balance, increase pressure on the opposite leg and joints, and even affect overall mood due to lack of exercise that may ensue. If not addressed quickly, a collapsed bone, severed ligament, or permanent deformity may develop.

In the case of breaks or fractures, foot treatment can be as straightforward as a cast or brace if treated quickly. A digital x-ray will indicate how to proceed. When an MRI is indicated, our office has a digital extremity MRI which means just the foot and ankle are inserted into the machine … no confining tube for your body! If the break is serious or ignored, surgery may be an option to offset the shift in the foot/ankle structure. Stress fractures may require protective footgear for a period of time.

Swelling is a sure sign that medical attention is in order, but it doesn’t always indicate a compromised bone. Swelling of the foot and ankle could be a result of an injury, but may also be caused by a medication, diet, pregnancy, or blood clot. Determining the source of swelling requires a medical diagnosis.

Some of the more common foot conditions we see at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates:

  • Fungal nail infections are hard to treat and unfortunately don’t go away without treatment.
  • Bunions occur at the base of the large toe forcing the toe to migrate toward the smaller ones.
  • Corns and calluses, or thick, hard areas of dead skin, are caused by friction or pressure.
  • Gout is actually a type of arthritis that occurs in the big toe.
  • Athlete’s foot is contagious, usually picked up by going barefoot in damp areas like a locker room.
  • Hammertoes can be painful, generally seen in any of the middle toes when bent at the middle joint. It is often hereditary.
  • Plantar fasciitis is often at the worst case in the morning and is noted with pain across the bottom of the foot.
  • There are more common foot conditions, and fortunately, they are generally correctable.

Our team of physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates handles many types of extremity, joint, and back injuries. While all injuries are to be taken seriously, damage to the foot and ankle musculoskeletal system should be carefully monitored, as these injuries may cause challenges in other parts of the body. If you’ve had an accident and are seeking treatment, contact us today at 941-951-2663 to make an appointment. We have four locations and offer same day appointments when necessary. You may also make an appointment directly through our website at www.SOA.md   Just click on the button at the home page to request an appointment.

Please like our Facebook page HERE and Follow Us on Twitter HERE.

Foot_care

Sources: www.SOA.md and WebMD